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2004 Seminar Series
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Friday May 14 th , 8PM

Crime Writing in the City: Fact, Fiction, and Forensics

free lecture with celebrated crime writers
Edna Buchanan
and Aphrodite Jones

Thursday, Dec. 9, 2004 at 12:30 pm in WC 130

 


Prof. Stephen R. Palumbi, Stanford University

“DNA forensics in fish markets and other
detective work”

 

Monday, September 27, 2004 at 1:00 p.m. in CP153

 

Classification and Discrimination
of Samples Under Conditions of Spatial or Temporal Variability

Dr. Gordon Miskelly,
Forensic Science Programme, Department of Chemistry,
The University of Auckland,
Auckland, New Zealand

Forensic scientists can be called upon to make classifications of samples, to discriminate between samples, or both. Examples of classifications are identifying the country (or region) of origin of produce or drugs, identification of the species from which a bloodspot originated, or identifying the oilfield from which a crude oil sample originated.

Discrimination, on the other hand, concerns the likelihood that two samples (of produce, drugs, blood, oil etc.) could have originated from the same source based on their similarity or dissimilarity. While it is possible to perform both discrimination and classification on some types of samples, other samples (and analytical techniques) are more suited to one of these decision types. The modification of samples by weathering or human influence can further alter our ability to classify or discriminate. This seminar will examine some of the challenges involved in such analyses, using case studies of classification of wine origin in New Zealand and discrimination of diesel samples in New Zealand.

In these cases, the small nature of the country, high variability of the geology, and varied winemaking styles, all affect our ability to classify or discriminate between samples.

Dr. Gordon Miskelly received his BSc(Hons) in Chemistry in 1981 and his PhD in Inorganic Chemistry in 1986, both from the University of Otago in New Zealand. He then pursued postdoctoral studies in electrochemistry at Stanford University and the California Institute of Technology, before obtaining a position as assistant professor at the University of Southern California in 1989.

In 1995 Dr. Miskelly moved to the University of Auckland as a lecturer in analytical chemistry. He is currently a senior lecturer in analytical chemistry and is also the Deputy Director of the Forensic Science programme run jointly by the University of Auckland and ESR Ltd., the major provider of forensic science services to the New Zealand Police. His current research interests include development of new methods for visualizing latent evidence and developing methods for discriminating environmental samples.


Tuesday, March 30, 2004 at 3:45 p.m.

 

The Department of Biological Sciences and the International Forensic Research Institute (IFRI) at FIU cordially invite you to attend a seminar by

DR. KALAI MATHEE
Assistant Professor
Department of Biological Sciences and IFRI

Dr. Mathee will present an illustrated talk entitled:

NON-HUMAN DNA: APPLICATION OF MICROBIAL COMMUNITY ANALYSIS FOR CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATIONS

The seminar will take place on Tuesday afternoon, March 30, at 3:45 p.m. in the Wertheim Conservatory (WC 130) at the University Park campus. Light refreshments will be served beginning at 3:30 p.m.

 

Monday, January 12, 2004 11:00 am

Distinguished Forensic Scientist Seminar Series



Dr. Jurian Hoogewerff
, Research Scientist
Mass Spectrometry Team
Institute of Food Research
Norwich Research Park
Colney
Norwich NR4 7UA
UK

Dr. Hoogewerff is an internationally recognized expert on isotope ratio mass spectrometry, a geochemist by training and also the manager of the European funded NITECRIME network.

Time and Date: Monday, January 12, 2004 11:00 am

Location: Wertheim Center

 

Monday, January 12, 2004 11:00 am

 

"Oetzi: finding his origins with isotopes and trace elements"

(Oetzi is the "Iceman" recently discovered in the Italian Alps.)