The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church

Biographical Dictionary
(1903-2011)
H

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HAMAO, Stephen Fumio
(1930-2007)

Birth. March 9, 1930, Tōkyō, Japan. He was baptized when he was sixteen years old. His elder brother, Minoru, was a chamberlain to the emperor of Japan.

Education. Tōkyō State University, Tōkyō; Major Interdiocesan Seminary, Tōkyō, from 1949; Pontifical Collegio Urbaniano, Rome, from 1951 (philosophy and theology); Pontifical Gregorian University (canon law). He spoke English, French, Italian and Spanish, besides Japanese, and was learning Korean when he died. He taught Latin to Crown Prince Akihito, who later became emperor of Japan, but firmly opposed the new push for Latin in the Catholic Church.

Priesthood. Ordained, December 21, 1957, Rome, chapel of the Pontifical Collegio Urbaniano, Rome, by Pietro Sigismondi, titular archbishop of Neapoli di Pisidia, secretary of the S.C. of Propaganda Fide. In the same ceremony was also ordained Emmanuel Wamala, future cardinal. Returned to Tōkyō and worked in the chancery; was secretary to the cardinal archbishop; vice-chancellor of the archdiocese; notary and vice-official of the ecclesiastical tribunal; responsible for ministry to students in the archdiocese; pastor of the cathedral; secretary of the Episcopal Commission for Liturgy; member of the presbyteral council; and member of the preparatory commission of the archdiocesan synod.

Episcopate. Elected titular bishop of Oreto and appointed auxiliary of Tōkyō, February 5, 1970. Consecrated, April 29, 1970, cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Tōkyō, by Bruno Wustenberg, titular archbishop of Tiro, pro-nuncio in Japan, assisted by Peter Seiichi Shirayanagi, archbishop of Tōkyō, and by Luke Katsusaburo Arai, bishop of Yokohama. In 1970, he was a passenger on Japan Airlines flight 351, which was hijacked. Transferred to see of Yokohama, October 30, 1979. Attended the Sixth Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, September 29 to October 28, 1983. President of the Episcopal Conference of Japan, 1995-1998. In 1996, he initiated the annual meeting of Japanese and Korean bishops that has continued. Attended the Special Assembly for Asia of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, April 29 to May 14, 1998. Promoted to archbishop and named president of the Pontifical Council for the Pastoral Care for Migrants and Itinerants, June 15, 1998; resigned the pastoral government of the diocese of Yokohama, June 15, 1998. Attended the Special Assembly for Oceania of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, November 22 to December 12, 1998. Attended the Second Special Assembly for Europe of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, October 1 to 23, 1999. Attended the Tenth Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, September 30 to October 27, 2001. His sense of humor and his willingness to travel anywhere to spend time with refugees, seafarers, circus workers and Roman gypsies became distinctive marks of his ministry.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal deacon in the consistory of October 21, 2003; received the red biretta and the deaconry of S. Giovanni Bosco in via Tuscolana, October 21, 2003. Participated in the conclave of April 18 to 19, 2005, which elected Pope Benedict XVI. Attended the Eleventh General Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, October 2 to 23, 2005. Resigned the presidency of the Pontifical Council for the Pastoral Care of Migrants and Itinerants for having reached the age limit, March 11, 2006. After returning from Japan on August 24, 2006, he underwent medical tests at Rome's Gemelli Hospital. The doctors there diagnosed lung cancer, and he decided to return to his homeland. Two days before departing for Tōkyō on October 9, he had a private audience with the pope. His work as consultor in the Congregation for the Causes of Saints helped advance the cause of 188 Japanese martyrs who would be beatified in 2008.

Death. November 8, 2007, in the evening, of lung cancer, Tōkyō. The funeral took place on Monday November 12, 2007, at noon, at the metropolitan cathedral of St. Mary, Tōkyō, with Cardinal Peter Seiichi Shirayanagi, archbishop emeritus of Tōkyō, as principal celebrant and representative of Pope Benedict XVI. Some 1,800 people, including about 200 bishops and priests, took part in the concelebrated mass. The late cardinal was buried at the Catholic Cemetery of the Yokohama diocese, in a specially constructed tomb at the center of the cemetery.

Links. Brief biographical data, in English (at the end of the page), diocese of Yokohama; and some of his documents, in English, Pontifical Council for the Pastoral Care of Migrants and Itinerant People.


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HAMER, O.P., Jean Jérôme
(1916-1996)

Birth. June 1, 1916, Brussels, Belgium.

Education. Joined the Order of Preachers (Dominicans), September, 1934; took name of Jérôme. Studied at the Dominican Studium Generale, La Sarte and Louvain; military service; during the Second World War, was three months in prison (1940); University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland (doctorate in theology).

Priesthood. Ordained, August 3, 1941. Further studies, 1941-1944. Faculty member, University of Fribourg, 1944-1962; Pontifical Angelicum Athenaeum, Rome, 1952-1953; Studium Generale, La Sarte; Dominican faculty of Saulchoir, France; rector, 1956-1962. Secretary general of studies of his order and general assistant for French Dominican provinces, 1962-1966. Expert at the Secretariat for Christian Unity of the Second Vatican Council, 1962-1965. Secretary adjunct of the Secretariat for Christian Unity, 1966-1969; secretary, April 12, 1969.

Episcopate. Elected titular archbishop of Lorium and appointed secretary of the S.C. for Doctrine of Faith, June 14, 1973. Consecrated, June 29, 1973, patriarchal Vatican basilica, by Pope Paul VI, assisted by Agostino Casaroli, titular archbishop of Cartago, secretary of the S.C. for Extraordinary Ecclesiastical Affairs, and by Bernardin Gantin, former archbishop of Cotonou, secretary of the S.C. for the Evangelization of Peoples. Attended the Third General Conference of the Latin American Episcopate, Puebla, México, January 27 to February 13, 1979. Pro-prefect of the Congregation for Religious and Secular Institutes, April 8, 1984.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal deacon in the consistory of May 25, 1985; received the red biretta and the deaconry of S. Saba, May 25, 1985. Prefect of the Congregation for Religious and Secular Institutes, May 27, 1985. Attended the Second Extraordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, November 24 to December 8, 1985; the Seventh Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, October 1 to 30, 1987. Papal delegate to the Ninth centennial celebration of the monastery of St. John Evangelist, Patmos and Athens, Greece, September 23 to 27, 1988. Attended the Eighth Ordinary Assembly the of Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, September 30 to October 28, 1990. Attended the Special Assembly of the Synod of Bishops for Europe, Vatican City, November 28 to December 14, 1991. Resigned prefecture, January 21, 1992. Opted for the order of cardinal priests and his deaconry was elevated pro illa vice to title, January 29, 1996. Lost the right to participate in the conclave when he turned 80 years old, June 1, 1996.

Death. December 2, 1996, Rome. Buried in the chapel of the Order of Preachers, Campo Verano cemetery, Rome.

Link. His arms, Araldica Vaticana.


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HARTMANN, Felix von
(1851-1919)

Birth. December 15, 1851, Münster, Germany. Son of Albert von Hartmann and Maria von Heister. Received the sacrament of confirmation, August 2, 1865.

Education. Seminary of Münster, Münster, 1870-1874; University of Münster (philosophy and theology); Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome; Pontifical Roman Athenaeum "S. Apollinare", Rome (doctorate in canon law, 1877).

Priesthood. Ordained, December 19, 1874, Münster. Further studies, Rome, 1874-1880. Chaplain of S. Maria dell'Anima, German church in Rome, 1875-1880. Privy chamberlain of His Holiness, October 22, 1879. Pastoral ministry in the diocese of Münster, 1880-1890; coadjutor of the parishes of Havixbeck and Emmerich. Secretary to the bishop of Münster, 1890-1903. Counselor of the episcopal curia of Münich, 1895-1905. Canon of the cathedral chapter of Münster, 1903-1905. Privy chamberlain of His Holiness, October 23, 1903. Vicar general of Münster, 1905-1911; dean of the chapter and vicar capitular, 1910. Protonotary apostolic ad instar participantium, December 20, 1907.

Episcopate. Elected by the chapter bishop of Münster, June 9, 1911; confirmed by the pope, July 27, 1911. Consecrated, October 26, 1911, cathedral of Münster, by Cardinal Anton Fischer, archbishop of Cologne, assisted by Michael Felix Korum, bishop of Trier, and by Karl Josef Schulte, bishop of Paderborn. Elected by the chapter archbishop of Cologne, October 29, 1912; confirmed by the pope, December 2, 1912. Chairman of the Fulda Conference of Catholic Bishops, 1914-1919. Awarded the grand cross of Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of May 25, 1914; received the red hat and the title of S. Giovanni a Porta Latina, May 28, 1914. Awarded the grand cross and bailiff of honor of the Sovereign Order of Malta, June 1914. Participated in the conclave of 1914, which elected Pope Benedict XV. Member of the Prussian Chamber of Lords, January 1916.

Death. November 11, 1919, from complications after suffering a cerebral hemorrhage with signs of paralysis, in Cologne. Buried in the archbishop's crypt of the metropolitan cathedral of Cologne.

Bibliography. Berg, Ludwig. Ein Kirchenfürst im Felde : Seine Eminenz Felix Kardinal v. Hartmann Erzbischof von Cöln, an der Westfront v. 6. bis 14. April 1916 Bericht .... [s. l.] : Bachem, 1917. Responsibility : zsgest von dem kath. Feldgeistlichen d. Grossen Hauptquartiers Prof. Dr. Berg; Hartmann, Felix von. Dr. Felix von Hartmann, Bischof von Münster, erwählter Erzbischof von Köln : Ein Lebensbild. Köln : Bachem, 1913; Hartmann, Felix von. Die göttliche Vorsehung : Hirtenbrief Sr. Eminenz d. Herrn Felix Kard. v. Hartmann, Erzbischof von Köln ; Erlassen am 25. Jan. 1915. Köln : Bachem, 1915; Hartmann, Felix von. Hirtenbrief Sr. Erzbischöfl. : Gnaden des Hochw. Herrn Felix v. Hartmann, Erzbischof von Cöln, erlassen z. Tage d. Inthronisation am 9. April 1913. Cöln : Bachem, 1913; Hegel, Edward. "Hartmann, Felix von." Die Bischöfe der deutschsprachigen Länder, 1785/1803 bis 1945 : ein biographisches Lexikon. Herausgegeben von Erwin Gatz. Berlin : Duncker & Humblot, 1983, pp. 286-289; Pięta, Zenonem. Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recentioris Aevi. Volumen IX (1903-1922). Patavii : Typis et Sumptibus Domus Editorialis "Il Messaggero di S. Antonio" apud Basilicam S. Antonii, 2002, pp. 13, 23, 135 and 257; Waal, Anton de. Die Kirche St. Johannis ante Portam latinam in Rom, Titularkirche Sr. Eminenz des hochwürdigsten Herrn Felix Kardinal v. Hartmann, Erzbischof von Köln. Köln : Bachem, 1914.

Links. Biography, in German; his portrait and biographical data, in German, cathedral of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; his tomb in the crypt of the metropolitan cathedral of Cologne; catalog of bishops and archbishops of Cologne with their portraits and biographies in German; and his photograph and arms, Araldica Vaticana.


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HAYES, Patrick Joseph
(1867-1938)

Birth. November 20, 1867, New York, United States of America. Son of Daniel Hayes and Mary Gleason.

Education. Manhattan College, N.Y.; St. Joseph's Seminary, Troy, N.Y.; The Catholic University of America, Washington.

Priesthood. Ordained, September 8, 1892, Troy, by Michael Augustine Corrigan, archbishop of New York. Pastoral ministry in the archdiocese of New York, 1894-1903; 1915-1919. Further studies, 1892-1894. President of the Catholic College, New York, and archdiocesan chancellor of New York, 1903-1914. Domestic prelate of His Holiness, October 15, 1907.

Episcopate. Elected titular bishop of Tagaste and appointed auxiliary of New York, July 3, 1914. Consecrated, October 14, 1914, St. Patrick's cathedral, New York, by Cardinal John Farley, archbishop of New York, assisted by Henry Gabriels, bishop of Ogdensburg, and by Thomas Francis Cusack, bishop of Albany. Military ordinary for United States Army and Navy, November 24, 1917. Promoted to the metropolitan see of New York, March 10, 1919.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of March 24, 1924; received the red hat and the title of S. Maria in Via, March 27, 1924. Legate a latere to the National Eucharistic Congress, Cleveland, Ohio, August 20, 1935.

Death. September 4, 1938, quietly, while saying his night prayers, of a heart attack caused by coronary thrombosis in Monticello, Sullivan County, New York. The members of his household found him in his bedroom with a crucifix clasped in his fingers. More than 500,000 people filed past his coffin as he lay in state in the metropolitan cathedral of St. Patrick in New York. Buried in that metropolitan cathedral. The Cardinal Hayes High School in The Bronx is named after him.

Bibliography. Bransom, Charles N. Ordinations of U. S. Catholic bishops 1970-1989. A chronological list. Washington, D.C. : National Conference of Catholic Bishops ; United States Catholic Conference, 1990, p. 68; Code, Bernard. Dictionary of the American Hierarchy (1789-1964). New York : Joseph F. Wagner, 1964, pp. 127-128; Kelly. John B. Cardinal Hayes, one of ourselves. New York: Farrar and Rinehart, 1940.

Link. His arms, Araldica Vaticana.


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HEARD, William Theodore
(1884-1973)

Birth. February 24, 1884, Edinburgh, Scotland. Eldest son of of William Augustus Heard, headmaster of Fettes College, and Elizabeth Tamar Burt; she died when William Theodore was four. On August 9, 1910, he was received into the Roman Catholic Church by Father Stanislaus St. John, S.J,, at the Jesuit church of the Immaculate Conceptionin, Farm Street, Mayfair, London.

Education. Oxford University, Oxford, England; Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome (doctorate in philosophy, 1915; doctorates in both theology and canon law, 1921).

Priesthood. Ordained, March 30, 1918, Rome, for the diocese of Southwark (now a metropolitan archdiocese), England. Further studies in Rome, 1918-1921. Confessor for the students of the Venerable English College, Rome, 1918-1921; 1927-1960s. Pastoral ministry in the diocese of Southwark, England, 1921-1927. Domestic prelate of His Holiness, September 30, 1927. Auditor of the Sacred Roman Rota, October 1, 1927, when Monsignor Prior died; he became its dean on December 15, 1958.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal deacon in the consistory of December 14, 1959; received the red hat and the deaconry of S. Teodoro, December 17, 1959. His cardinalitial motto was Recte et sapienter. He was the first Scottish cardinal since the Reformation.

Episcopate. Elected titular archbishop of Feredi maggiore, April 5, 1962. Consecrated, April 19, 1962, patriarchal Lateran basilica, Rome, by Pope John XXIII, assisted by Cardinal Giuseppe Pizzardo and by Cardinal Benedetto Aloisi Masella. In the same ceremony were consecrated Cardinals Joaquín Anselmo María Albareda, O.S.B., Antonio Bacci, Augustin Bea, S.J., Francesco Bracci, Michael Browne, O.P., Alberto di Jorio, André Jullien, P.S.S., Arcadio María Larraona, C.M.F., Francesco Morano, Alfredo Ottaviani and Francesco Roberti. Attended the Second Vatican Council, 1962-1965. Participated in the conclave of 1963, which elected Pope Paul VI. Opted for the order of cardinal priests and his deaconry was elevated pro illa vice to title, May 18, 1970. Lost the right to participate in the conclave by being older than eighty years, January 1, 1971. He had a long decline aggravated by failing sight and hearing. He became ill on the plane bringing him back to Rome from a holiday in Scotland, where he had been staying with his friend Archbishop James Donald Scanlan of Glasgow (1). He returned regularly to Scotland in the summer for holidays. He received an honorary degree from the University of Edinburgh.

Death. September 16, 1973, at the clinic of the Blue Sisters at S. Stefano Rotondo, Rome. He received the last rites from Father John Hughes, S.J., from Glasgow. Pope Paul VI left Castelgandolfo and went to Rome to visit the cardinal's body shortly after his death. Bishop Brewer was the principal celebrant at the requiem mass in the patriarchal Vatican basilica. Cardinal Gordon Joseph Gray, archbishop of St. Andrews and Edinburgh; Archbishop James Donald Scanlan, archbishop of Glasgow; and Bishop Edward Ellis of Nottingham were in attendance. He was buried in the chapel of the Venerable English College, in Campo Verano cemetery, Rome.

Bibliography. Bellenger, Dominc Aidan and Stella Fletcher. Princes of the church. A history of the English cardinals. Phoenix Mill, Gloucestershire : Sutton Publishing Ltd., 2001, p. 159-160; Schofield, Nicholas ; Skinner, Gerard. The English cardinals. Oxford, UK : Family Publications, 2007, p. 208-210.

Link. Biography, in English, Wikipedia; The Cardinal and the Boat Race, in English, Roman Miscellany, Thursday, 17 August 2006, by Father Nicholas Schofield, Archivist of the Archdiocese of Westminster; his portrait by Derek Hill, Balliol College, University of Oxford, The Public Catalogue Foundation, BBC; his portrait and arms, Araldica Vaticana.


(1) He had been accompanied to the airport by Archbishop Scanlan and his auxiliary bishop, later cardinal, Thomas Winning. They had a serious discussion about whether or not they should allow Cardinal Heard to take his flight, but the cardinal was insistent that he wanted to get back to Rome. He was taken by ambulance from Fiumicino Airport to the clinic of the Blue Sisters, where he died exactly one week later.

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HEENAN, John Carmel
(1905-1975)

Birth. January 26, 1905, Ilford, diocese of Brentwood, England. Youngest of the four children of James Carmel Heenan, a clerk in the Patent Office, and Anne Pilkington; both parents were Irish. John Carmel had a twin brother, the second, christened George, who died 12 hours after his birth.

Education. Initial studies, for a brief time, under the Ursuline nuns; then, under the Jesuits at Stamford Hill; Ushaw College, Durham; sent to Rome in 1924, he resided at the Venerable English College (the rector was Monsignor Arthur Hinsley, future cardinal) and studied at the Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome.

Priesthood. Ordained, July 16, 1930, Ilford. Pastoral ministry in the diocese of Brentwood, 1931-1947: curate at St. Mary and Ethelburga, Barking, 1931-1937; parish priest of St. Stephen, Manor park, 1937-1947. Superior of the Catholic Missionary Society in England and Wales, based in the archdiocese of Westminster, 1947-1951.

Episcopate. Elected bishop of Leeds, January 27, 1951. Consecrated, March 12, 1951, Leeds, by William Godfrey, titular archbishop of Cio, Apostolic delegate in Great Britain, assisted by Joseph McCormack, bishop of Hexham and Newcastle, and by John Edward Petit, bishop of Menevia. Promoted to the metropolitan see of Liverpool, May 2, 1957. Attended the Second Vatican Council, 1962-1965. Transferred to the metropolitan see of Westminster, September 2, 1963.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of February 22, 1965; received the red biretta and the title of S. Silvestro in Capite, February 25, 1965. Attended the First Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, September 29 to October 29, 1967. President of the Bishops' Conference of England and Wales, 1968-1975. Attended the First Extraordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, October 11 to 28, 1969; the Second Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, September 30 to November 6, 1971.

Death. November 7, 1975, of a heart attack, after years of poor health, at Westminster Hospital, London. Buried in the metropolitan cathedral of Westminster in London, under the twelfth station of the Via Crucis, "Jesus dies on the Cross" (1).

Bibliography. Bellenger, Dominc Aidan and Stella Fletcher. Princes of the church. A history of the English cardinals. Phoenix Mill, Gloucestershire : Sutton Publishing Ltd., 2001, pp. 154-155, 161-166 and 179; Heenan, John Carmel. A crown of thorns : an autobiography, 1951-1963. London : Hodder & Stoughton, 1974; Schofield, Nicholas ; Skinner, Gerard. The English cardinals. Oxford, UK : Family Publications, 2007, p. 211-215; A tribute to the life and work of John Carmel Heenan : Cardinal Archbishop of Westminster, 1963-1975.. Abbots Langley, Herts. : Catholic Information Services, 1976; Walsh, Michael J. The Westminster cardinals : the past and the future. London ; New York : Burns & Oates, 2008, p. 167-193.

Link. His portrait and biography, in English; and his arms, Araldica Vaticana.

(1) This is the inscription on his vault, kindly provided by Mr. Eman Bonnici, from Malta:

JOHN
CARMEL
HEENAN
CARDINAL PRIEST
OF THE CHURCH OF
SAN SILVESTRO
IN CAPITE
EIGHTH ARCHBISHOP
OF
WESTMINSTER
1963 - 1975
BORN 1905 - DIED 1975
MAY HE REST
IN PEACE


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HENGSBACH, Franz
(1910-1991)

Birth. September 10, 1910, Velmede, archdiocese of Paderborn, Germany. Son of Johann and Theresia Hengsbach; he had five brothers and two sisters.

Education. Institute of Brilon, Brilon; Seminary of Paderborn, Paderborn; Seminary of Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau; Theological Faculty, Münich (obtained a doctorate in theology in 1944; dissertation: Das Wesen der Verkündigung - Eiene homiletische Untersuchung auf paulinischer Grundlag).

Priesthood. Ordained, March 13, 1937, Paderborn, by Kaspar Klein, archbishop of Paderborn. Vicar, Herne-Bukau, St. Mariren, 1937-1946. Secretary general of the Academy Bonifat-Eingung in Paderborn, 1946-1948. General secretary of the Central Committee for the Preparation of German Catholics, 1947. Director of the archdiocesan pastoral office of Paderborn, January 1, 1948-1958. Domestic prelate of His Holiness, 1952. General secretary of the Central Committe of German Catholic, April 30, 1952.

Episcopate. Elected titular bishop of Cantano and appointed auxiliary of Paderborn, August 20, 1953. Consecrated, September 29, 1953, metropolitan cathedral of Paderborn, by Lorenz Jaeger, archbishop of Paderborn, assisted by Wilhelm Weskamm, bishop of Berlin, and by Friedrich Maria Rintelen, titular bishop of Cusira, auxiliary of Paderborn. Transferred to the see of Essen, November 18, 1957. Founder of "Adveniat", organization of the German episcopate to assist the church in Latin America. Military ordinary for Germany, October 10, 1961 until May 22, 1978. Attended the Second Vatican Council, 1962-1965. Attended the Second Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, September 30 to November 6, 1971. Grand prior of the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem. President, German episcopal commission for Universal Church affairs, 1976. Member, Council of the European Episcopal Conference, 1977. Attended the Third General Conference of the Latin American Episcopate, Puebla, México, January 27 to February 13, 1979.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of June 28, 1988; received the red biretta and the title of Nostra Signora di Guadalupe a Monte Mario, June 28, 1988. Lost the right to participate in conclave when turned eighty years of age, September 10, 1990. Resigned the pastoral government of the diocese, February 21, 1991. He was known throughout Germany as the "workers' bishop". He wore a piece of coal in his bishop's ring to symbolize his concern for miners and other workers.

Death. June 24, 1991, in a hospital in Essen, from complications after a stomach surgery. Buried in the crypt of the cathedral of Essen (1). A lifesize colored statue of the cardinal was erected in the cathedral grounds of Essen on the occasion of the centenary of his birth in 2010. The conference center for the training of priests, pastoral education and retreats in the diocese of Essen is named the "Kardinal-Hengsbach-Haus" in his honor.

Bibliography. Brandt, Hans Jürgen ; Hellmich, Klaus. Zeitzeuge Kardinal Franz Hengsbach : zum Gedenken an den Gründerbischof des Bistums Essen, 1910-1991. Essen, Germany : Verlag Ferdinand Kamp GmbH & Co., 1991; Gatz, Erwin. Die Bischöfe der deutschsprachigen Länder, 1945 2001 : ein biographisches Lexikon. Unter Mitwirkung von Franz Xaver Bischof ... [et al.] ; herausgegeben von Erwin Gatz. Berlin : Duncker & Humblot, 2002, p. 192-198.

Link. His arms, Araldica Vaticana.

(1) This is the inscription in his tomb, kindly provided by Mr. Eman Bonnici from Malta:

FRANZ KARDINAL HENGSBACH
10. SEPT. 1910   24. JUNI. 1991
BISCHOF VON ESSEN
1958 - 1991

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HERRANZ CASADO, Julián
(1930-

Birth. March 31, 1930, Baena, diocese of Córdoba, Spain.

Education. Joined the Sacerdotal Society of the Holy Cross and the Opus Dei (1), 1949, while he studied medicine in Madrid; Pontifical University of S. Tommaso d'Aquino, Rome (doctorate in canon law); University of Barcelona, Barcelona (doctorate in medicine); University of Navarra, Pamplona (doctorate in medicine).

Priesthood. Ordained, August 7, 1955, church of la Concepción, Madrid, by Juan Ricote Alonso, titular bishop of Miletopoli, auxiliary of Madrid. Professor of canon law, University of Navarra. Worked in the S.C. of the Council in catechetical and disciplinary matters concerning Latin America. In the Second Vatican Council, 1962-1965, was assistant of study of the commissions for the discipline of the clergy and the Christian people. Undersecretary of the Pontifical Commission for the Interpretation of the Code of Canon Law. Member of the Institute of Juridical Studies Martín de Azpilcueta and of the editorial board of the journal Studi Cattolici, Milan, and Ius Canonicum, Pamplona. Collaborator to the Dictionarium morale et canonicum, Rome, and to the Gran Enciclopedia Rialp, Madrid. Collaborator also to numerous publications on canon law. In the prelature of the Opus Dei has performed pastoral ministry in Italy, Spain, Hispanic America, England, Ireland, France and Kenya. Secretary of the Pontifical Commission for the Interpretation of the Code of Canon Law, later Pontifical Council for the Interpretation of the Legislative Texts, 1984. Consultor of the Congregation for Bishops and member of several special commissions of the Roman Curia.

Episcopate. Elected titular bishop of Vertara, December 15, 1990. Consecrated, January 6, 1991, patriarchal Vatican basilica, by Pope John Paul II, assisted by Giovanni Battista Re, titular archbishop of Vescovio, substitute of the Secretariat of State, and by Justin Francis Rigali, titular archbishop of Bolsena, secretary of the Congregation for Bishops. In the same ceremony were consecrated future Cardinals Jean-Louis Tauran, Vinko Puljić, and Francisco Javier Errázuriz Ossa, of the Fathers of Schönstatt. His episcopal motto is Domine ut videam. Promoted to archbishop, and named president of the Pontifical Council for the Interpretation of the Legislative Texts, December 19, 1994; confirmed for another quinquennium, November 16, 1999. Attended the Special Assembly for America of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, November 16 to December 12, 1997. Attended the Special Assembly for Asia of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, April 29 to May 14, 1998. President of the Disciplinary Commission of the Roman Curia, December 3, 1999. Attended the Second Special Assembly for Europe of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, October 1 to 23, 1999. Attended the Tenth Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, September 30 to October 27, 2001.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal deacon in the consistory of October 21, 2003; received the red biretta and the deaconry of S. Eugenio, October 21, 2003. Participated in the conclave of April 18 to 19, 2005, which elected Pope Benedict XVI. Reappointed president of the Pontifical Council for the Interpretation of the Legislative Texts and president of the Disciplinary Commission of the Roman Curia, April 21, 2005. Attended the Eleventh General Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, October 2 to 23, 2005. Elected honorary academician of Real Academia de Jurisprudencia y Legislación de España, January 15, 2007. On February 15, 2007, the pope accepted the resignation from the post of president of the Pontifical Council for the Interpretation of the Legislative Texts that he had presented according to canon 354 of the Code of Canon Law. Special papal envoy to the celebrations of the 1750º anniversary of the martyrdom of Bishop Saint Fructuoso and Deacons Saints Augurio and Eulogio, known as the protomartyrs of Tarragona, Spain, which took place in that city on January 25, 2009. Lost the right to participate in the conclave when turned eighty years of age on March 31, 2010. Resigned the presidency of the Disciplinary Commission of the Roman Curia, May 11, 2010. President of the Commission of Cardinals to investigate the leak of reserved and confidential documents on television, in newspapers and in other communications media, April 24, 2012. Opted for the order of cardinal priests on June 12, 2014 and his deaconry, S.Eugenio, was elevated pro hac vice to title.

Links. Interview, on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of the Code of Canon Law, Vatican Radio, January 25, 2003, in Spanish; his arms, Araldica Vaticana; Spanish Cardinal Julián Herranz talks about John Paul II's biggest record, video, Rome Reports, 2012-05-01 18:54:30; Cardenal Herranz asegura que hay más mártires ahora que en cualquier momento de la historia, ACI Prensa, Roma, 10 Jun. 12 / 06:31 pm; Presentaron a Benedicto XVI los resultados de la investigación sobre las cartas robadas by H. Sergio Mora, in Spanish, Zenit, el Mundo visto desde Roma, 18-06-2012; Lombardi: Commission is carrying out full scale investigation into Vatican document leaks by Alessandro Speciale, Vatican Insider, 06/18/2012.

(1) On August 23, 1982, Pope John Paul II erected the Personal Prelature of the Holy Cross and Opus Dei by the apostolic constitution Ut Sit.


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HERRERA ORIA, Ángel
(1886-1968)

Birth. December 19, 1886, Santander, Spain. Thirteenth of the fifteen children of José Herrera Ariosa and Asunción Oria. Four of the siblings were Jesuit priests, one of them a missionary in China.

Education. Secondary studies with the Jesuit Fathers in Valladolid; University of Deusto, Deusto (law); University of Salamanca, Salamanca (licentiate in law, 1905); University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland (ecclesiastical studies, 1936-1940).

Early life. Entered the Cuerpo de Abogados del Estado, by opposition, in 1908; sent to the Delegation of the Treasury, Burgos; he was there for a year. Returned to Madrid and entered the Marian Congregation of los Luises, directed by Father Ángel Ayala, S.J. On December 3, 1909, he was named president of the recently founded Asociación Católica Nacional de Jóvenes Propagandistas; he travelled through a large part of the country promoting Catholic principles. Director of El Debate, November 1, 1911-1933. Founder of Editorial Católica, of El Debate School of Journalism, of Confederación Nacional Católica Agraria, and of Centro de Estudios Universitarios e Instituto Social Obrero.Participated in the formation of Pax Romana as well as in the initial steps of the Summer University of Santander. President of Central Board of Spanish Catholic Action, 1933-1936.

Priesthood. Ordained, July 28, 1940, Seminary of Saint Charles, Fribourg. Returned to Spain in 1943. Coadjutor of the parish of Santa Lucía, the diocese of Santander, 1943-1947.

Episcopate. Elected bishop of Málaga, April 24, 1947. Consecrated, June 30, 1947, parish church of Santa Lucía, temporary cathedral, by Gaetano Cicognani, titular archbishop of Ancira, nuncio in Spain, assisted by José María Eguino Trecu, bishop of Santander and by Juan Hervás y Benet, titular bishop of Alinda and coadjutor of Mallorca. He was installed on the following October12. His episcopal motto was Orationi et ministerio Verbi. Established Instituto Social Leôn XIII in 1952; its Facultad Eclesiástica de Ciencias Sociales earned great prestige. Promoted the Escuela de Ciudadanía Cristiana; the Residencia para Obreros Pío XI; and created the School of Journalism of the Church. He steadfastly campaigned for greater freedom and better living conditions for his countrymen and fought illiteracy with the construction of some 250 new elementary schools.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of February 22, 1965; received the red biretta, March 1, 1965, Madrid, from Generalissimo Francisco Franco, chief of State; and the title of Sacro Cuore di Maria, March 26, 1965. Resigned the pastoral government of the diocese, August 27, 1966.

Death. July 28, 1968, Madrid. Buried in the chapel of San Rafael in the cathedral of Málaga on July 31, 1968 (1); the bust of the cardinal, in bronze, was sculpted by Víctor de los Ríos, from Málaga; the wrought iron grill that closes the chapel is the work of maestro Luis Gómez (1770).

Beatification. His cause of beatification was introduced on November 20, 1995. The diocesan phase was finished in 2010.

Bibliography. Echeverría, Lamberto de. Episcopologio español contemporáneo, 1868-1985 : datos biográficos y genealogía espiritual de los 585 obispos nacidos o consagrados en España entre el 1 de enero de 1868 y el 31 de diciembre de 1985 . Salamanca : Universidad de Salamanca, 1986. (Acta Salmanticensia; Derecho; 45), p. 108; García Escudero, José María. Conversaciones sobre Ángel Herrera. Prólogo por Emilio Benavent Escuín. Madrid : Editorial Católica, 1986. (Biblioteca de autores cristianos ; 485); García Escudero, José María. De periodista a cardenal : vida de Angel Herrera. Madrid : Biblioteca de Autores Cristianos, 1998. (Biblioteca de autores cristianos ; 590); Herrera Oria, Ángel ; García Escudero, José María. El pensamiento de Ángel Herrera : antología política y social. Madrid : Biblioteca de Autores Cristianos, 1987. (Biblioteca de autores cristianos ; 486); Herrera Oria, Ángel: Obras completas. 6 vols. Edited by José Luis Gutiérrez García. Madrid: Biblioteca de Autores Cristianos, 2002-2006; Herrera Oria, Angel; García Escudero, José María. Homenaje a Ángel Herrera Oria. Santander : Tantin, 1987. Contents: Ángel Herrera / José María García Escudero -- La Iglesia y la guerra civil / Fernando García de Cortázar -- Herrera Oria ante la problemática social / José Andrés Gallego -- Herrera Oria y el catolicismo político español / Javier Tusell -- Angel Herrera, hombre de Iglesia / José Luis Gutiérrez García; Martín Artajo, Alberto. El pensamiento social del cardenal Herrera Oria. Madrid : [s.n.], 1969. General Info: Overdr. uit: "Anales" de la Real Academia de Ciencias Morales y Políticas; no. 46, 1969. Other title: "Anales" de la Real Academia de Ciencias Morales y Políticas; no. 46, 1969; Sánchez Jiménez, José. El cardenal Herrera Oria : pensamiento y acción social. Madrid : Ediciones Encuentro, 1986. (Ensayos ; 28; Variation: Ensayos (Ediciones Encuentro) ; 28).

Links. His statue and biography, in English, Wikipedia; El Siervo de Dios Ángel Herrera Oria. Semblanza biográfica by José María García Escudero, Fundación Pablo VI, Pontificia Universidad de Salamanca, campus de Madrid; photograph and biography by Nieves San Martín, in Italian, Santi e Beati; his tomb, chapel of San Rafael, cathedral of Málaga, Málaga (at the bottom of the page); and his arms, Araldica Vaticana (the top photograph is not his); Ángel Herrera Oria: Documental, in Spanish, You Tube; He was a Cardinal and a journalist, now Ángel Herrera Oria could soon become a saint, in English, Rome Reports.

(1) This is the text of the inscription on his sarcophagus, kindly provided by Mr. Eman Bonnici, from Malta:

+ ANGEL CARDENAL HERRERA ORIA
OBISPO DE MALAGA
19 - XII - 1886         28 - VII - 1968


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HICKEY, James Aloysius
(1920-2004)

Birth. October 11, 1920, Midland, diocese of Saginaw, Michigan, United States of America. Son of James Peter Hickey, a dentist who taught his son about charity by example, treating patients who could not pay for their dental care during the Depression, and Agnes Ryan.

Education. Sacred Heart Seminary College, Detroit; Catholic University of America, Washington; Pontifical Lateran University (doctorate in canon law); Pontifical Angelicum University, Rome (doctorate in theology).

Priesthood. Ordained, June 15, 1946, Saginaw, by William Francis Murphy, bishop of Saginaw. Pastoral ministry in the diocese of Saginaw, 1946-1947. Further studies, Rome, 1947-1951. In Saginaw, pastoral ministry; secretary to the bishop, 1957-1966; founder and rector of St. Paul Seminary. Attended the Second Vatican Council, 1962-1965; as expert and assistant to Bishop Stephen Stanislaus Woznicki of Saginaw. Domestic prelate of His Holiness, October 31, 1963.

Episcopate. Elected titular bishop of Taraqua and appointed auxiliary of Saginaw, February 18, 1967. Consecrated, April 14, 1967, cathedral of St. Mary, Saginaw, by John Francis Dearden, archbishop of Detroit, assisted by Stephen Stanislaus Woznicki, bishop of Saginaw, and by Stephen Aloysius Leven, titular bishop of Bure, auxiliary of San Antonio. His episcopal motto was Veritatem in caritate. Rector of the North American College, Rome, March 1969. Transferred to the see of Cleveland, May 31, 1974. Promoted to the metropolitan see of Washington, June 17, 1980.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of June 28, 1988; received the red biretta and the title of S. Maria Madre del Redentore a Tor Bella Monaca, June 28, 1988. Attended the Eighth Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, September 30 to October 28, 1990; member of the general secretariat, 1990-1994. Attended the Ninth Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, October 2 to 29, 1994. Special papal envoy to the ceremonies for the 150th anniversary of the erection of the diocese of Cleveland, U.S.A., August 17, 1997. Attended the Special Assembly for America of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, November 16 to December 12, 1997. Lost the right to participate in the conclave when turned eighty years of age, October 11, 2000. Resigned the pastoral government of the archdiocese, November 21, 2000.

Death. October 24, 2004, at 6:15 a.m., in his sleep while suffering from pneumonia, at the Jeanne Jugan Home of the Little Sisters of the Poor, Washington, D.C. The funeral took place in the basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception on the campus of The Catholic University of America; Cardinal William Wakefield Baum, penitentiary major emeritus and former archbishop of Washington, represented the pope; the main celebrant was Cardinal Theodore Edgar McCarrick, archbishop of Washington. The late cardinal was buried in St. Francis Chapel, St. Matthew's metropolitan cathedral, Washington (1). Cardinal Patrick O'Boyle, former archbishop of Washington, was also buried there following his death in 1987.

Bibliography. Bransonm, Charles N. Ordinations of U.S. Catholic bishops, 1790-1989. A chronological list. Washington : National Conference of Catholic Bishops ; United States Catholic Conference, 1990, p. 151; Code, Bernard. American Bishops 1964-1970. St. Louis : Wexford Press, 1970, p. 9 MacGregor, Morris. "Hickey, James Aloysius." New Catholic encyclopedia : jubilee volume, the Wojtyła years. Detroit, MI : Gale Group in association with the Catholic University of America, 2001, p. 309-310.

Links. Photograph and biography, in English; his arms, archdiocese of Washington; his arms, Araldica Vaticana.

(1) This is the simple inscription in his vault, kindly provided by Mr. Eman Bonnici, from Malta:

JAMES CARDINAL HICKEY
1920 - 2004
ARCHBISHOP OF WASHINGTON
1980 - 2000


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HINSLEY, Arthur
(1865-1943)

Birth. August 25, 1865, Carlton in Yorkshire, Selby, diocese of Leeds, England. Second of the four children of Thomas Hinsley, a local carpenter, and his wife, Bridget Ryan, from Ireland. The other children were Charles Joseph, Annie Elizabeth and Alfred Thomas. He received the sacrament of confirmation from Bishop Robert Cornthwaite of Beverly on October 11, 1874; his confirmation sponsor was Thomas Himsworth.

Education. Studied at Ushaw College, Durham, from 1876; then, at the Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome; and later at the Pontifical Roman Academy of St. Thomas Aquinas, Rome.

Priesthood. Ordained, December 23; 1893, Rome. Faculty member of Ushaw College, 1893-1897. Pastoral ministry in the archdiocese of Westminster, 1898. Headmaster of St. Bede's Grammar School, 1899-1904. Pastoral ministry in the archdiocese of Westminster, 1904-1917. Domestic prelate of His Holiness, November 14, 1917. Rector of the Venerable English College, Rome, 1917-1930.

Episcopate. Elected titular bishop of Sebastopoli, August 10, 1926. Consecrated, November 30, 1926, chapel of the English College, Rome, by Cardinal Rafael Merry del Val, secretary of the Supreme S.C. of the Holy Office, assisted by Giuseppe Palica, titular archbishop of Filippi, and by Peter Emmanuel Amigo, bishop of Southwark. Apostolic visitor to British Africa, December 10, 1927. Promoted to titular archbishop of Sardes and appointed apostolic delegate to the British missions in Africa that were not under the jurisdiction of the apostolic delegates in Egypt, Belgian Congo, and South Africa, January 9, 1930. Resigned the delegation, March 25, 1934. Canon of the chapter of the patriarchal Vatican basilica, March 29, 1934. Transferred to the metropolitan see of Westminster, April 1, 1935.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of December 13, 1937; received the red hat and the title of S. Susanna, December 16, 1937. Participated in the conclave of 1939, which elected Pope Pius XII.

Death. March 17, 1943, of a heart attack when he was already nearly blind and deaf, Butingford, near London. Buried in the chapel of St. Joseph in the metropolitan cathedral of Westminster in London (1).

Bibliography. Bellenger, Dominc Aidan and Stella Fletcher. Princes of the church. A history of the English cardinals. Phoenix Mill, Gloucestershire : Sutton Publishing Ltd., 2001, p. 149-150, 153-159, 161, 163, 169 and 178; Hagerty, James. Cardinal Hinsley: priest and patriot. Oxford : Family Publications, 2008. Contents: From boyhood to priesthood, 1865-1900 -- The headmaster, 1900-1904 -- On the mission, 1904-1917 -- Rector of the Venerabile, 1917-1930 -- Catholic missions and colonial policy -- Apostolic visitor, 1928-1930 -- Imposing Vatican policy -- Larger fields and wider horizons, 1930-1934 -- Building the African church -- 'Habemus Ducem' : Archbishop of Westminster, 1935 -- Settling in, 1935-1937 -- International affairs, 1936-1939 -- Domestic affairs, 1935-1943 -- A bishop in wartime, 1939-1943 -- The cross and the flag, 1939-1943 -- Ireland, exiles and Jews, 1935-1943; Heenan, John Carmel. Cardinal Hinsley. London : Burns, Oates, and Washbourne, Ltd., 1944; Moloney, Thomas. Westminster, Whitehall and the Vatican. The role of Cardinal Hinsley, 1935-43. Foreword by Cardinal Basil , O.S.B. Tunbridge Wells, Kent : Burns & Oates, 1985; Schofield, Nicholas ; Skinner, Gerard. The English cardinals. Oxford, UK : Family Publications, 2007, p. 194-198; Walsh, Michael J. The Westminster cardinals : the past and the future. London ; New York : Burns & Oates, 2008, p. 111-134.

Links. His portrait and biography, in English, archdiocese of Westminster; his photograph and biography, in English (Britannica); and his photograph, Araldica Vaticana.

(1) This is the inscription on his tomb, kindly provided by Mr. Mark West, from London, England:

CARDINAL ARTHUR HINSLEY
FIFTH ARCHBISHOP OF WESTMINSTER
BORN AUGUST 25TH 1865
DIED MARCH 17TH 1943
R.I.P.


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HLOND, S.D.B., August
(1881-1948)

Birth. July 5, 1881, Brzęczkowice, diocese of Katowice, Poland. Son of Jan Hlond and Maria Imilów. He had five brothers, Ignacy (missionary in Argenina); Antoni Wiktor (also a Salesian; better known as Antoni Wiktor Chlondowski, priest and musican); Jan Paweł; Stanisław; and Klemens; and six sisters, Anna, Paulina, Maria, Marta, and two girls who died shortly after birth. Baptized, July 10, 1881, in in the church of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, in Mysłowice. His baptismal name was August Józef. His first name is also listed as Augustus and Augustyn. In 1893, attracted by the fame of Don Giovanni Bosco, he followed his elder brother to Italy to join the congregation founded by Don Bosco. Another two brothers also entered the congregation.

Education. Joined the Pious Society of St. Francis de Sales (Salesians of Don Bosco), Foglizzo, Italy, 1896; received the religious habit from Michele Rua, future blessed; professed, 1897. Salesian houses of studies in Turin, Kraków, Lwow, and Rome; Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome (doctorate in philosophy, July 10, 1900). Returned to Poland to complete his regency (practical training) at Oswiecim. Received the subdiaconate on March 18, 1905; and the diaconate on July 9, 1905.

Priesthood. Ordained, September 23, 1905, Kraków, by Anatol Nowak, titular bishop of Irenopoli, auxiliary of Kraków. Further studies, 1905-1907. Rector of the new Salesian house of Pizemyśl, 1907-1909; and later of that of Vienna, 1909-1919. In 1919 when the Austro-Hungarian province was divided, he was named provincial, 1919-1922; he founded some ten new houses. Apostolic administrator of Upper Silesia, November 7, 1922. Protonotary apostolic, November 15, 1922.

Episcopate. Elected bishop of Katowice, December 14, 1925. Consecrated, January 3, 1926, Katowice, by Cardinal Aleksander Kakowski, archbishop of Warsaw, assisted by Anatol Nowak, titular bishop of Irenopoli, auxiliary of Kraków, and by Stanisław Kostka Łukomski, titular bishop of Sicca Veneria, auxiliary of Gniezno and Poznań. Promoted to the metropolitan see of Gniezno and Poznań, June 24, 1926.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of June 20, 1927; received the red hat and the title of S. Maria della Pace, December 22, 1927. Papal legate to the National Eucharistic Congress, Ljubljana, Yugoslavia, June 9, 1935; to the First National Congress of Christ the King, Poznań, May 16, 1937. Participated in the conclave of 1939, which elected Pope Pius XII. Papal legate to the 6th National Congress of Christ the King, Ljubljana, Yugoslavia, July 8, 1939. During the Second World War, the cardinal was forced into exile until the end of the belic conflict; at first, he went to Rome and conducted a strong defence of his fatherland; then, he went to Lourdes and the Nazi police deported him to Paris and tried to convince him to organize a Polish government favourable to them; the cardinal refused; arrested by the Gestapo on February 3, 1944, he was imprisoned by the Nazis, first at Lorene and later at Westphalia; later, the Allied forces freed him on April 1, 1945; he returned to Poznań on July 20, 1945. Transferred to the metropolitan see of Warsaw and named primate of Poland, June 13, 1946; he retained ad personam the archdiocese of Gniezno. Strongly opposed the Nazi and Communist regimes in Poland.

Death. October 22, 1948, of pneumonia, Warsaw. Buried in metropolitan cathedral of Warsaw.

Beatification. On January 9, 1992, the process for his beatification was started and he received the title of Servant of God; it was finished on October 21, 1996.

Bibliography. Kant, Bronislaw. Sztygar Bozej kopalni : obrazki z zycia ks. Kardynala Augusta Hlonda. Lódz : Wydawnictwo Salezjanskie, 1983. Wyd. 2-e. Other Titles: Obrazki z zycia ks. Kardynala Augusta Hlonda; Myszor, Jerzy ; Konieczny, Jan (red.). Korespondencja Augusta Hlonda i Józefa Gawliny w latach 1924-1948. Katowice: Księgarnia Św. Jacka - Wydział Teologiczny Uniwersytetu Śląskiego, 2003; Obrazki z zycia ksiedza Kardynala Augusta Hlonda; Nitecki, Piotr. Biskupi Kościoła w Polsce w latach 965-1999. Słownik biograficzny. Przedmowa Henryk Gulbinowicz. Warszawa : Instytut Wydawniczy "Pax", Warszawa 2000, col. 149; Prokop, Krzysztof Rafał. Polscy kardynałowie. Kraków : Wydawnictwo WAM, 2001, pp. 237-250; Scholz, Franz. Zwischen Staatsräson und Evangelium : Kardinal Hlond und die Tragödie der ostdeutschen Diözesen : Tatsachen, Hintergründe, Anfragen . 2 edition, verb. und erw. Frankfurt am Main : J. Knecht, 1988; Serwatka, Tomasz. Koncepcje społeczno-polityczne Prymasa Polski Augusta Hlonda (1926-1948). Poznań : Wydawnictwo Towarzystwa Chrystusowego Hlondianum, 2006.

Links. Photograph, arms and biography, in Polish; chronography, in English, Catholic Hierarchy; portrait and biographical data for his beatification, in English; his portrait by Józef Męcina - Krzesz, Muzeum Narodowe, Poznań; catalog of archbishops of Gniezno and primates of Poland, in English; and his photograph and arms, Araldica Vaticana.


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HÖFFNER, Joseph
(1906-1987)

Birth. December 24, 1906, Horhausen, diocese of Trier, Germany. He was the eldest son of Paul Höffner, a famer, and Helene Schug.

Education. Studied at Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gymnasium in Montabaur, until 1922; at Friedrich-Wilhelms-Gymnasium in Trier, from 1922 to 1926; at the Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome, 1926 to 1934 (theology and philosophy; obtained a doctorate in philosophy in 1929, thesis: "Der technische Fortschritt und das Heil des Menschen"; obtained a doctorate in theology in 1934, thesis: "Soziale Gerechtigkeit und soziale Liebe: Versuch einer Bestimmung ihres Wesens"; further studies from 1937 to 1939 in theology and economics in Freiburg; earned a second doctorate in theology in 1938, thesis: "Bauer und Kirche im deutschen Mittelalter"; obtained a diploma in economics in 1939; earned a doctorate in economics in 1940, thesis: Wirtschaftsethik und Monopole im fünfzehnten und sechzehnten Jahrhundert"; received the "Habilitation" in theology in the Theological Faculty of Friburg im Breisgau in 1945, thesis: "Christentum und Menschenwürde. Das Anliegen der spanischen Kolonialethik im Goldenen Zeitalter".

Priesthood. Ordained, October 30, 1932, Rome, by Cardinal Francesco Marchetti Selvaggiani, vicar general of Rome. Further studies, 1934-1940. Pastoral ministry: chaplan in Saarbrücken, 1934-1936; parish priest in Kail (Mosel); parish priest in Trier; 1943-1945. Professor of pastoral theology and "Christliche Soziallehre" at the Seminary of Trier, 1945-1950; of the Theological Faculty of Trier, 1950-1951. Professor of "Christliche Sozialwissenschaften" at the University of Münster, 1951-1962. Founder, director, and faculty member of the Institute of Christian Social Sciences, Münich, 1951-1961. Scientific advisor to three ministries of the Federal Republic of Germany.

Episcopate. Elected bishop of Münster, July 9, 1962. Consecrated, September 14, 1962, by Matthias Wehr, bishop of Trier, assisted by Heinrich Baaken, titular bishop of Gordo, and by Heinrich Tenhumberg, titular bishop of Tuburnica, auxiliary of Münster. His episcopal motto was Justitia et Caritas. Attended the Second Vatican Council, 1962-1965. In 1966, he was granted the grand plaque of honor of the Kolping-Familie and the grand Order of Merit with star; the grand cross of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany (1981); the grand cross of the Order of Merit of the Republic of Italy (1982); and the ring of honor of the Gverres Society (1986). Promoted to titular archbishop of Aquileia and appointed coadjutor of Cologne, with right of succession, January 6, 1969. Transferred to the metropolitan see of Cologne, February 24, 1969.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of April 28, 1969; received the red biretta and the title of S. Andrea della Valle, April 30, 1969. Attended the Second Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, September 30 to November 6, 1971; relator; member of the Board of the General Secretariat of the Synod of Bishops, November 6, 1971. Received a doctorate honoris causa from Sophia-University, Tokio (1973); from the Pontifical University of St. Thomas, Manila, Philippines (1978); from Fu-Jen Catholic University, Taipeh (1979); from Ateneo de Manila University (1983); and from Universidad Panamericana, México (1986). Attended the Third Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, September 27 to October 26, 1974; the Fourth Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, September 30 to October 29, 1977; member of the general secretariat, 1977-1980. Chairman of the German Conference of Bishops, 1976 to 1987. Participated in the conclave of August 25 to 26,1978, which elected Pope John Paul I. Participated in the conclave of October 14 to 16,1978, which elected Pope John Paul II. Attended the First Plenary Assembly of the Sacred College of Cardinals, Vatican City, November 5 to 9, 1979; the Fifth Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, September 26 to October 25, 1980. Member of the Council of Cardinals for the Study of the Organizational and Economic Problems of the Holy See, May 31, 1981. Special papal envoy to the consecration of the cathedral of Stockholm, Sweden, March 25, 1983. Attended the Sixth Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, September 29 to October 28, 1983; the Second Extraordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, November 24 to December 8, 1985. Lost the right to participate in the conclave when turned eighty years of age, December 24, 1986. Resigned the pastoral government of the archdiocese, September 14, 1987; a few months before he had been diagnosed with an unoperable brain tumor. He was one of the greatest experts of his time on Church social doctrine.

Death. October 16, 1987, of a brain tumor, in Cologne. The funeral mass was celebrated by Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, later Pope Benedict XVI. He was buried in the metropolitan cathedral of Cologne. In October 2003, he and his sister Helene Hesseler-Höffner were named "Righteous Among the Nations" by the state of Israel, for having saved Jewish lives during the Second World War. The award is the highest conferred by Israel on non-Jews.The "Deutsche Post" honored him in 2006, on the occasion of his 100th birthday, with a stamp, which included his photo and episcopal motto.

Bibliography. Gatz, Erwin. "Höffner, Joseph." Die Bischöfe der deutschsprachigen Länder, 1945 2001 : ein biographisches Lexikon. Unter Mitwirkung von Franz Xaver Bischof ... [et al.] ; herausgegeben von Erwin Gatz. Berlin : Duncker & Humblot, 2002, p. 290-295; Höffner, Joseph ; Weyand, Winfried. Schriftenverzeichnis Joseph Höffner, 1933-1983. Köln : Die Bibliothek, 1986. Responsibility: von Winfried Weyand ; herausgegeben von der Erzbischöflichen Diözesan- und Dombibliothek Köln; Höffner, Joseph ; Weyand, Winfried. Schriftenverzeichnis Joseph Höffner, 1984-1988. Köln : Die Bibliothek, 1986. Responsibility: von Winfried Weyand ; herausgegeben von der Erzbischöflichen Diözesan- und Dombibliothek Köln. Note: Continues: Schriftenverzeichnis Joseph Höffner, 1933-1983.

Links. Portrait and biographical informatiom, in German; his tomb, metropolitan cathedral of Colgne; his arms, Araldica Vaticana; and catalog of bishops and archbishops of Cologne with their portraits and biographies in German.


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HONORÉ, Jean
(1920-2013)

Birth. August 13, 1920, Saint-Brice-en-Coglès (Ille-et-Vilaine), archdiocese of Rennes, France. From a family of merchants that had eight children. His baptismal name was Jean Marcel. His parents died when he was very young.

Education. Intial studies in Saint-Brice-en-Coglès; then, at Collège of Saint-Malo; later, at the Major Seminary of Rennes; and finally, at the Institut Catholique, Paris, where he earned a doctorate in theology, with a thesis on the spirituality of Cardinal John Henry Newman; he also obtained a diploma from Ecole Pratique de Hautes Études.

Priesthood. Ordained, June 29, 1943, for the archdiocese of Rennes. Professor of letters in the colleges of Saint-Vincent, Rennes (1945) and of Saint-Malo (1946-1947); professor of dogmatic theology and catechesis, Major Seminary of Rennes (1948-1958); secretary general of the National Commission for Religious Education and director of the National Center of Religious Teaching (1958-1964). Domestic prelate of His Holiness, November 19, 1964 (title changed to prelate of honor of His Holiness in 1968). Rector of the Catholic University of the West in Angers (1964-1972).

Episcopate. Elected bishop of Evreux, October 24, 1972. Consecrated, December 17, 1972, cathedral of Notre-Dame, Evreux, by Cardinal Paul-Joseph-Marie Gouyon, archbishop of Rennes, assisted by André Paillier, archbishop of Rouen, and by Henri Louis Marie Mazerat, bishop of Angers. His episcopal motto was Cor ad cor loquitur. Promoted to the metropolitan see of Tours, August 13, 1981. Member of the Congregation for Catholic Education. In 1985, he ws named member of the editorial board for the preparation of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, which was published in 1992. Resigned the pastoral government of the archdiocese, July 23, 1997.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of February 21, 2001; received the red biretta and the title of S. Maria della Salute a Primavalle, February 21, 2001. Promoted to the cardinalate when he was over 80 years old, and thus, he did not have the right to participate in the conclave. Attended the Tenth Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, September 30 to October 27, 2001. Among his published works were L'itinéraire spirituel de Newman (Seuil, 1964); Présence au monde et Parole de Dieu (Mame, 1969); La fidélité d'une conoscience (Cld, 1986); Newman, sa vie, et sa pensé (Descléè, 1988); La Pensée christologique de Newman (Descléè, 1996); Fais paraître ton jour, Newman prophète e poète de l'au-delá (Cerf, 2000); Fais paraitre ton Newman, un homme de Dieu (Cerf, 2003) e, and Les aphorismes de Newman (Cerf, 2007). In 2006, he published the book of memories Le grâce d'être né (Presses de la renaissance).

Death. February 28, 2013, in the morning, in a hospital in Tours, where he had been admitted two days earlier. Upon learning the news of his death, Pope Benedict XVI prayed for the eternal repose of the soul of the late cardinal and sent Bernard-Nicolas Jean-Marie Aubertin, O. Cist., archbishop of Tours, a telegram of condolence (1). From Friday March 1 to Monday March 4, 2013, the body of the late cardinal rested in the chapel of the Great Bretèche, the mother house of the Dominicans of the Presentation, situated at 15 quai Portillon in Tours. The chapel will open from 9 a.m until 5 p.m. The obsequies, presided by Archbishop Aubertin, O. Cist., were celebrated in the metropolitan cathedral of that archdiocese. More than one thousand persons took part in the ceremony, as well as tens of priests and numerous religious and civil personalities. Concelebrating were Luigi Ventura, titular archbishop of Equilo, apostolic nuncio in France; Jean-Louis Bruguès, archivist and librarian of the Holy Roman Church, who delivered the eulogy; Pierre d'Ornellas, archbishop of Rennes; Denis Moutel, bishop of St-Brieuc; Christian Nourrichard, bishop of Evreux; Jean Orchampt, bishop emeritus of Angers; the vicars general of Blois and of Bourges; and Monsignor Bernard Podvin, adjunct secretary general and representative of the French Episcopal Conference. Present were representatives of other Christian confessions and of the Jewish and Muslim religions. Also present were M. Frédéric Thomas, president of the gneral council; Mme. Claude Greff, deputy; Mme. Arlette Bosc, adjunct mayor of Tours; M. Jean Germain, mayor of Tours; and M. Sibilleau, director of the cabinet of the prefect. The inhumation took place in the metropolitan cathedral, in a lateral chapel, beside the tombs of archbishops emeritus of Tours Michel Paul Marie Moutel, P.S.S., who died in 1998; and Louis Henri Marie Ferrand, who died in 2003.

Bibliography. Jore, Alexander. Épiscopologe Français de 1592 à 1973. Mis à jour et continué jusqu'en 2004. Complément de l'article "France" du Dictionnaire d'Histoire et de Géographie Ecclésiastiques t. XVIII, colonnes 161 à 532. Pro-Manuscripto, 25 - III- 2004, no. 3196.

Links. Biography, in French, Wikipedia; photograph and biography, in English, Holy See Press Office; photograph and biography, in Italian, Sala Stampa de la Santa Sede; his photograph and arms, Araldica Vaticana; Le cardinal Jean Honoré est mort by Claire Lesegretain , La Croix, 28/2/13 - 12 h 40; Décès du Cardinal Jean Honoré, Archevêque émérite de Tours, Conférence des évêques de France - 28 féévrier 2013; Décès du Cardinal Jean Honoré, archdiocese of Tours; Les obsèques du Cardinal Jean Honoré, archdiocese of Tours.

(1) This is the text of the telegam, taken from the Press Office of the Holy See:
Son Excellence
Monseigneur Bernard-Nicolas Aubertin
Archêveque de Tours
Apprenant avec émotion le décès du Cardinal Jean Honoré, archvêque êmêrite de Tours, je vous adresse mes vives condolêances ainsi qu'à sa famille et à ses anciens diocésains. Que le Seigneur accueille dans sa paix et dans sa lumière ce pasteur fidèle, qui a servi l'Église avec dévouement dans l'Enseignement catholique et dans la catéchèse, puis comme Evêque d'Evreux et enfin comme Archevêque de Tours. Artisan compétent et passionné de la rédaction du Catéchisme de l'Église catholique, il a toujours eu le souci d'annoncer l'Évangile à tous dans le monde contemporain. En gage de réconfort, je vous adresse una particulière Bénédiction Apostolique, ainsi qu'à la famille du Cardinal défunte et à ses proches, à ses anciens diocésains de Tours et d'Evreux, ainsi quà toutes les personne qui prenderont part à la célébration des obsèques.

BENEDICTUS PP. XVI

Analogous telegram was sent by Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone, S.D.B., secretary of State.


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HORNIG, Károly
(1840-1917)

Birth. August 10, 1840 (1), Buda (2), archdiocese of Esztergom (Gran), Austria-Hungary. Of a noble family. Received the sacrament of confirmation in 1853.

Education. Studied at the Seminary of Budapest; at the Augustineum Imperial College, Vienna, 1862-1866; at the Royal University of Budapest, where he earned a doctorate in theology on November 25, 1869. Received the insignias of the clerical character and the minor orders on November 20, 1859; the subdiaconate on July 23, 1862; and the diaconate on July 25, 1862.

Priesthood. Ordained, December 14, 1862. Professor of biblical studies at the Royal University of Budapest, 1862-1869. Secretary to Cardinal János Simor, archbishop of Esztergom (Gran), in the First Vatican Council, 1869-1870. Rector of the Seminary of Budapest, 1870-1878. Canon of the metropolitan chapter and director of the archiepiscopal chancery of Esztergom, 1878-1888. Privy chamberlain of His Holiness ad honorem. Titular abbot of the monastery of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Babolcha. Counselor to the ministries of Worship and Public Instruction, 1882-1888. Nomnated to the see of Veszprém, Hungary, by Empeor Franz Joseph I of Austria-Hungary on April 18, 1888.

Episcopate. Elected bishop of Veszprém, Hungary, July 1, 1888. Consecrated, September 8,1888, Esztergom, by Cardinal János Simor, archbishop of Esztergom, assisted by Janos Zalka, bishop of Györ, and by Kornel Hidasy, bishop of Szombathely.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of December 2, 1912; the pope sent him the red biretta with an apostolic brief dated December 2, 1912; received the red hat and the title of S. Agnese fuori mura, May 28, 1914. Participated in the conclave of 1914, which elected Pope Benedict XV. Crowned King Károl I and Queen Zita of Hungary, December 30, 1916.

Death. February 9, 1917, Veszprém (3). Buried, cathedral of Veszprém.

Bibliography. Pięta, Zenonem. Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recientoris Aevi. Volumen IX (1903-1922). Patavii : Typis et Sumptibus Domus Editorialis "Il Messaggero di S. Antonio" apud Basilicam S. Antonii, 2002, pp. 12 and 21 ; Ritzler, Remigium, and Pirminum Sefrin. Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recientoris Aevi. Volumen VIII (1846-1903). Patavii : Typis et Sumptibus Domus Editorialis "Il Messaggero di S. Antonio" apud Basilicam S. Antonii, 1979, p. 588; Tusor, Péter. Purpura Pannonica : az esztergomi "bíborosi szék" kialakulásának elozminyei a 17. században = Purpura Pannonica : the "Cardinalitial See" of Strigonium and its Antecedens in the 17th Century. Budapest : Róma : Research Institute of Church History at Péter Pázmány Catholic University, 2005. (Collectanea Vaticana Hungariae, Classis I, vol. 3), pp. 209 and 329.

Links. Biography, in Hungarian, Magyar Elektronihus Könyvtár; biography, in Hungarian, Magyar Elektronihus Könyvtár; biography, in Hungarian, Magyar Katolikus Lexikon; and his portrait and photograph, Araldica Vaticana.

(1) This is according to the two biographies linked above, as well as La Gerarchia Cattolica e la Famiglia Pontificia, 1922, p. 65. Ritzler, Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recentioris Aevi, VIII, 588, says that he was born on January 15, 1840.
(2) This is according Ritzler, Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recentioris Aevi, VIII, 588. The first biography linked above also says that he was born in Buda, but the second one says that he was born in Pest. In 1873, Buda, Óbuda, and Pest were united into the city of Budapest.
(3) This is according to Ritzler, Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recentioris Aevi, IX, 12; La Gerarchia Cattolica e la Famiglia Pontificia, 1922, p. 65; and the second biography linked above; the first one indicates that he died in Esztergom.


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HOSSU, Iuliu
(1885-1970)

Birth. January 30, 1885, Milasul Mare, archdiocese of Făgăraş e Alba Julia, Rumania. His parents were Ioan Hossu and Victoria Măriuţiu.

Education. Seminary of Cluj, Cluj; Seminary of Budapest, Budapest; University of Vienna, Vienna; Pontifical Urbanian Athenaeum "De Propaganda Fide," Rome (doctorate in philosophy, 1906; doctorate in theology, 1908).

Priesthood. Ordained, March 27, 1910, Rome, by Vasile Hossu, bishop of Gherla, who was his uncle. Further studies, 1910-1911. Protocolist, archivist, librarian, and later, vicar and secretary to the bishop of Gherla, 1911-1914. Military chaplain to the Rumanian soldiers in the Austro-Hungarian Army during World War I, 1914-1917.

Episcopate. Elected bishop of Gherla of the Byzantine-Rumanian rite, April 21, 1917. Consecrated, December 4, 1917, Blaj, by Victor Mihali d'Apsa, archbishop of Făgăraş e Alba Julia, assisted by Demetriu Radu, bishop of Oradea Mare, and by Valeriu Frentiu, bishop of Lugoj. Named bishop of Cluj-Gherla when the see was transferred to Cluj, June 5, 1930. Apostolic administrator of Maramures from July 19, 1930 to January 31, 1931. Senator of the Kingdom of Rumania. Assistant at the Pontifical Throne, September 16, 1936. Apostolic administrator of Oradea Mare from August 29, 1941 until 1947. For his firm opposition to the governmental plans to separate the Byzantine-Rumanian Church from Rome, was compelled to leave his diocese, October 28, 1948. Interned at Jilava, Drogoslavele, Sighet, and Gherla, 1948-1964. Confined in the monastery of Caldrusani, Moara Saraca, near Bucharest, 1964-1970. Transferred to the Coletina Hospital, Bucharest, May 1970.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal and reserved in pectore in the consistory of April 28, 1969. His creation was revealed on March 5, 1973, after his death (1).

Death. May 28, 1970, at 9 a.m., Coletina Hospital, Bucharest, assisted by Alexandru Todea, titular bishop of Cesaropoli. Buried, Bellu Catholic Cemetery, Bucharest. His last words were "Lupta mea s-a sfârs,it, a voastra continua" (My struggle ends, yours continue). On December 7, 1982, his remains were exhumed fron the provisional tomb in which they had been placed when he died, and transferred to a permanent one in the same cemetery.

Bibliography. Dumitriu-Snagov, Ion. "Hossu (Jules)." Dictionnaire d'histoire et de géographie ecclésiastiques, v. 24, col. 1237.

Link. Photographs and biography, in Romanian.

(1) According to Wilhelm von Tacke's article Ein Zeuge der vatikanischen Ostpolitik Erst in der rumänischen Untergrundkirche, dann zwölf Jahre in Gefängnissen - Zum Tode von Prälat Hieronymus Menges, Die Tagespost, no. 59, May 16, 2002, on February 22, 1969, Pope Paul VI granted a private audience to Msgr. Hieronymus Menges, who probably was one of the last living witnesses of the Vatican's Ostpolitik under Popes Pius XII to Paul VI. During the audience, Msgr. Menges asked the pope to encourage the Romanian faithful and to give them a sign that they are not forgotten. When the pope asked "What?" the monsignor recommended to the pope that the Byzantine Romanian Bishop Juliu Hossu of Cluj-Gherla and the Latin Bishop of Alba Julia Áron Márton be appointed cardinals; and to reward a few distinguished priests with the title of monsignor. Archbishop Agostino Casaroli, secretary of the S.C. for Extraordinary Ecclesiastical Affairs and main conductor of the Vatican Ospolitik, sent his secretary to Romania and asked the Ministry of Culture in Bucharest whether the state would accept the double promotion. The ministry agreed to the promotion of Latin Bishop Márton but not to the one of Byzantine Romanian Bishop Hossu. Bishop Márton refused the promotion when he heard that the Romanian government had rejected Bishop Hossu's cardinalitial creation. As a result, Bishop Hossu became cardinal in pectore and Bishop Márton, now a Servant of God, never received the red hat. Bishop Márton's biography in Wikipedia says that "in 1945, after the death of Cardinal Jusztinián Serédi, Pope Pius XII wanted Bishop Márton to become the next cardinal in Hungary, but, as the Hungarian Communist Party strongly opposed him, József Mindszenty was chosen for the position."


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HUME, O.S.B., George Basil
(1923-1999)

Birth. March 2, 1923, Newcastle-on-Tyne, diocese of Hexham and Newcastle, England. Son of Sir William Elrington Hume, a Scottish Protestant and prominent heart surgeon, and his wife Marie Élizabeth Tisseyre, a French Catholic. They met in France during the First World War and were married there in 1918. They had three daughters and two sons; Basil was the third child and eldest son.

Education. Saint Lawrence Abbey, Ampleforth; Oxford University, Oxford; University of Fribourg, Fribourg. Joined Order of Saint Benedict; took the name Basil; solemn profession, 1945.

Priesthood. Ordained, July 23, 1950. Further studies, 1950-1953. Faculty member, Superior School, Saint Lawrence Abbey, Ampleforth, 1953-1963. Elected abbot of Saint Lawrence abbey, Ampleforth, 1963; confirmed, 1970.

Episcopate. Elected archbishop of Westminster, February 9, 1976. Consecrated, March 25, 1976, cathedral of the Most Precious Blood, Westminster, London, by Bruno Bernard Heim, titular archbishop of Xanto, apostolic delegate in Great Britain, assisted by Basil Christopher Butler, titular bishop of Nova Barbara, and by John Gerard McClean, bishop of Middlesbrough. His episcopal motto was Pax inter spinas.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of May 24, 1976; received the red biretta and the title of S. Silvestro in Capite, May 24, 1976. Attended the Fourth Ordinary Assembly of Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, September 30 to October 29, 1977. Participated in conclave of August 25 to 26,1978, which elected Pope John Paul I. Participated in conclave of October 14 to 16,1978, which elected Pope John Paul II. President of the European Episcopal Conference. Attended the First Plenary Assembly of Sacred College of Cardinals, Vatican City, November 5 to 9, 1979; the Fifth Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, September 26 to October 25, 1980; member of general secretariat, 1980-1983. Attended the Sixth Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, September 29 to October 28, 1983; member of general secretariat, 1983-1986. Attended the Second Extraordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, November 24 to December 8, 1985; member of general secretariat until 1987. Attended the Special Assembly of the Synod of Bishops for Europe, Vatican City, November 28 to December 14, 1991; the Ninth Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, October 2 to 29, 1994; relator general. Announced that he was in the advanced stages of cancer, April 1999. He was decorated by Queen Elizabeth II with the Order of Merit on May 25, 1999. On his deathbed, he asked to be buried in his Benedictine habit and his pallium.

Death. June 17, 1999, of inoperable abdominal cancer, in London. The funeral mass took place on June 25, 1999 at Westminster cathedral, London; and was celebrated by Cardinal Edward Idris Cassidy, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, who was the pope's personal representative. Also concelebrating were Cardinal Thomas Winning, archbishop of Glasgow; Cardinal Cahal Daly, archbishop emeritus of Armagh; and Cardinal Adrianus Johannes Simonis, archbishop of Utrecht. The other concelebrants included the entire Episcopate of England and Wales, as well as Pablo Puente, titular archbishop of Macri, nuncio in Great Britain. The rite of Final Commendation and Farewell was conducted by Bishop Vincent Nichols, apostolic adminstrator of the archdiocese of Westminster; and the Burial was conducted by Monsignor George Stack, adminstrator of Westminster cathedral, future archbishop of Cardiff. Two thousand people participated in the funeral mass. The late cardinal was buried in the chapel of St. Gregory and St. Augustine, Westminster metropolitan cathedral, London (1). A monument to Cardinal Hume was unveiled by Queen Elizabeth II, outside St. Mary's Roman Cathedral in Newcastle upon Tyne on May 7, 2002.

Bibliography. Basil Hume : a portrait. Edited by Tony Castle. London : Collins, 1986; Bellenger, Dominc Aidan and Stella Fletcher. Princes of the church. A history of the English cardinals. Phoenix Mill, Gloucestershire : Sutton Publishing Ltd., 2001, p. 143, 149, 154, 161, 164-168 and 179; Howard, Anthony. Basil Hume : the monk cardinal. London : Headline, 2005. Commentary: On his death in 1999, the London Times observed: "Few churchmen in this century, inside or outside the Catholic Church, have died more deeply loved." Basil Hume's 23-year reign brought with it a state of harmony within the Catholic Church that hadn't been enjoyed for four centuries. A deeply holy man, Hume knew at an early age the path he wanted to follow, but it was never an easy journey. Ultimately, however, nothing could deter his dedication to that in which he believed, including his tireless campaign on behalf of the Maguire Seven and the Guildford Four. Granted unique access to Cardinal Hume's private papers and the people who knew him best, Anthony Howard chronicles Hume's long reign with clarity and insight; Schofield, Nicholas ; Skinner, Gerard. The English cardinals. Oxford, UK : Family Publications, 2007, p. 216-221; Walsh, Michael J. The Westminster cardinals : the past and the future. London ; New York : Burns & Oates, 2008, p. 195-222.

Links. His portrait and biography, in English, archdiocese of Westminster; biography, in English (Britannica); his arms, Araldica Vaticana; and the Cardinal George Basil Hume Memorial Garden, statue by Nigel Boonham, St. Mary's cathedral, Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumbria, England.

(1) Thi is the text of the inscription on his vault, kindly provided by Mr. Eman Bonnici, from Malta:

GEORGE
BASIL
HUME
O S B
2 MARCH 1923
17 JUNE 1999
Cardinal Priest
of San Silvestro
in Capite
FOURTH ABBOT OF AMPLEFORTH + 1963 - 1976
NINTH ARCHBISHOP OF WESTMINSTER 1976 - 1999


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HUMMES, O.F.M., Cláudio
(1934-

Birth. August 8, 1934, Montenegro, archdiocese of Porto Alegre, Brazil. His family originated in Germany. Son of Pedro Adão Hummes and Maria Frank Hummes. He was baptized with the names Cláudio Aury Affonso.

Education. Joined the Order of the Friars Minor (Franciscans) on February 1, 1952; solemn profession, February 2, 1956; Seminary Seráfico São Francisco, Taquari; Convent São Boaventura, Daltro Filho, Garibaldi (philosophy); Convent of Divinópolis, Divinópolis (theology); Pontifical Antonian Athenaeum, Rome (doctorate in philosophy; thesis: Renovação das provas tradicionais da existência de Deus por Maurice Blondel em l'Action [1893]); Institut Oecuménique, Bossey, Geneva, Switzerland (especialization in Ecumenism). Besides his native Portuguese, he also speaks Spanish, German and Italian.

Priesthood. Ordained, August 3, 1958, Divinópolis, by João Batista Resende Costa S.D.B., titular archbishop of Martiropoli, coadjutor, with right of succession, of Belo Horizonte. Further studies, Rome, 1959-1963. Further studies, Geneva, Switzerland, 1968. Professor of philosophy, Franciscan Seminary of Garibaldi and pastoral ministry in a parish, 1963-1968; concurrently, consultor for ecumenism of the National Conference of Bishops of Brazil, 1965-1968. Further studies, Geneva, Switzerland, 1968. From 1969 to 1972, professor and rector of the faculty of Philosophy of Viamão (RS), and professor of philosophy in the Pontifical Catholic University of Porto Alegre and counselor to the Franciscan students of philosophy. Provincial superior of the Franciscans of Rio Grande do Sul, in Porto Alegre, 1972-1975. President of the Latin American Franciscan Council.

Episcopate. Elected titular bishop of Carcabia and appointed coadjutor with right of succession of Santo André, March 22, 1975. Consecrated, May 25, 1975, Mother of God cathedral, Porto Alegre, by Aloísio Lorscheider, O.F.M., archbishop of Fortaleza, assisted by Mauro Morelli, titular bishop of Vartaba, and by Urbano Allgayer, titular bishop of Tunnuna. His episcopal motto is Vos sois todos irmaos. Succeeded to the see of Santo André, December 29, 1975. In Santo André, he helped to organize the metallurgical labor unions and supported their strikes; he also opened the doors of the churches to the clandestine reunions of the unionists and hid the leaders, persecuted by the military dictatorship (1964-1985), among them Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, the current president of Brazil; he opposed the Theology of Liberation and was a tireless defender of the poor and human rights. Attended the V Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, September 26 to October 25, 1980. Attended the Fourth General Conference of the Latin American Episcopate, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, October 12 to 28, 1992. Promoted to the metropolitan see of Fortaleza, May 29, 1996. He was one of the leading organizers of the World Encounter of Families in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 1997. Attended the Special Assembly for America of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, November 16 to December 12, 1997. Transferred to the metropolitan see of São Paulo, April 15, 1998. Grand Chancellor of the Pontifical Catholic University of São Paulo.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of February 21, 2001; received the red biretta and the title of S. Antonio da Padova in Via Merulana, February 21, 2001. Attended the Tenth Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, September 30 to October 27, 2001. Preached the Lenten spiritual exercises at the Vatican for the pope and the Roman Curia, February 18 to 23, 2002. Member of the Council of Cardinals for the Study of the Organizational and Economic Problems of the Holy See, December 16, 2004. Participated in the conclave of April 18 to 19, 2005, which elected Pope Benedict XVI. Attended the Eleventh General Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, October 2 to 23, 2005. Resigned the pastoral government of the archdiocese of São Paulo and was named prefect of the Congregation for the Clergy, October 31, 2006. Participated in the Fifth General Conference of the Latin American Episcopate that took place from May 13 to 31, 2007, in Aparecida, Brazil. Attended the Twelfth Ordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, October 5 to 26, 2008, on "The Word of God in the Life and Mission of the Church". Participated in the Second Special Assembly for Africa of the Synod of Bishops, October 4 to 25, 2009, Vatican City, on the theme "The Church in Africa, at the Service of Reconciliation, Justice and Peace: You Are the Salt of the Earth; You Are the Light of the World". Special papal envoy to the celebrations of the 16th Eucharistic Congress of Brazil, which took place in Brasília from May 13 to 16, 2010. Resigned the prefecture of the Congregation for the Clergy for limit of age on October 7, 2010. He resides in São Paulo. Participated in the conclave of March 12 to 13, 2013, which elected Pope Francis. On September 14, 2103, he was named special papal envoy to the conclusive celebrations of the 25th anniversary of the canonization of Saint Roque González de Santa Cruz, S.J., and martyr companions, programmed in Asunción, Paraguay, on November 15, 2013. Confirmed as member of the Pontifical Commission for Latin America on January 15, 2014.

Bibliography. Chapeau, O.S.B., André and Charles N. Bransom. "Franciscan bishops." Franciscan Studies, XLVIII (1988), 315-316.

Links. Photograph and biography, in Portuguese, archdiocese of São Paulo; his photograph and biography, in Italian, Sala Stampa della Santa Sede; his photograph and biography, in English, Holy See Press Office; and his arms, Araldica Vaticana; Ratzinger's resignation seen from the south by Alver Metalli, Vatican Insider, 02/11/2014; Diciotto giorni in Amazzonia by Alver Metalli, Vatican Insider, 9/06/2014.


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HUSAR, M.S.U., Lubomyr
(1933-

Birth. February 26, 1933, Lviv, Ukraine. Son of Jarosław Husar and Rościsława Demezuk. He felt his vocation to the priesthood when he was ten years old. Because of the difficult situation in his country, in 1944 the family sought refuge in Salzburg, Austria, and in 1949 migrated to the United States; three weeks after his arrival, he entered the seminary.

Education. St. Basil's College, Stamford, Connecticut (philosophy); Catholic University of America, Washington (licentiate in theology); Fordham University, New York (philosophy; obtained the "habilitation"); Pontifical Urbanian University, Rome (doctorate in theology; thesis: Metropolitan Andrew Sheptytsky - Pioneer of Ecumenism).

Priesthood. Ordained, March 30, 1958 for the eparchy of Stamford of the Ukrainians. From 1958 to 1969, faculty member and prefect, St. Basil's College Seminary, Stamford. From 1966-1969, pastor at Kerhonkson, N.Y. Further studies, Rome, 1969 to 1972. Professor of Ecclesiology, Pontifical Urbanian University, Rome, 1972-1984. Entered the Studite monastery, 1972; took the vows, June 24, 1972; superior of the Studite monastery, Grottaferrata, Italy, May 1974.

Episcopate. Consecrated bishop, April 2, 1977, chapel of the Studite monastery, Castelgandolfo, by Cardinal Josyf Slipyj, archbishop major of Lviv of the Ukrainians, assisted by Ivan Prasko, titular bishop of Zigris, and by Isidore Borecky, bishop of Toronto of the Ukrainians; without papal approval. Named archimandrite of the Studiti Monks in Europe and America, July 23, 1978. Named protosincello (vicar general) of the archbishop major of the Ukrainians, Cardinal Myroslav Lubachivsky, then in Rome. In 1993 returned to Ukraine with the community of his monastery. Organized a new monastery of Studiti monks in the eparchy of Ternopil, Ukraine, 1994. Elected by the Synod of Bishops of the Ukrainian Church exarch of the archiepiscopal exarchy of Kyiv-Vyshorod, Ukraine, 1995. Confirmed by the pope and nominated to titular see of Nisa di Licia, February 22, 1996. Named auxiliary of the archbishop major of Lviv of the Ukrainians by the Synod of Bishops of the Ukrainian Church, October 14, 1996 as coadjutor with special delegations in the pastoral goverment of the archdiocese. Attended Second Special Assembly for Europe of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, October 1 to 23, 1999. Named by the pope apostolic administrator sede vacante et ad nutum Sanctae Sedis of the major archbishopric of Lviv of the Ukrainians, December 23, 2000. Elected archbishop major of Lviv of the Ukrainians, January 25, 2001. Election confirmed by the pope, January 26, 2001.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of February 21, 2001; received title of S. Sofia a Via Boccea, February 21, 2001. Attended the Tenth Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, September 30 to October 27, 2001. Transferred to the see of Kyiv and Halyć, December 6, 2004. Participated in the conclave of April 18 to 19, 2005, which elected Pope Benedict XVI. Attended the Eleventh General Ordinary Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Vatican City, October 2 to 23, 2005. Resigned from the office of archbishop major of Kyiv-Halyč on February 10, 2011 for reasons of health due to an eye disease badly treated. Lost the right to participate in the conclave when turned eighty years old on February 26, 2013.

Links. Photograph and biographical data, in Ukranian, at the bottom of the page; photograph and biography, in English, at the bottom of the page; his arms, Araldica Vaticana; and interview with Mark Riedemann, host of the program "Where God weeps", about the story of the Greek Catholic Church and its key role as a mediator in Ukraine; Meet the cardinal who will barely miss out on the 2013 conclave, video, Rome Reports, 2013-02-26 12:19:17.


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HUYN, Paul von
(1868-1946)

Birth. February 17, 1868, Brünn, Moravia (now Brno, Czech Republic), Austrian Empire. Son of General Johann Karl Graf von Huyn. He is also listed as Paulus de Huyn; as Pavel Maria Josef Antonín, hrabě Huyn; and as Paul Graf Huyn.

Education. Studied t the Jesuit gymnazium in Karlsburku, near Vienna; then he went to study philosophy at Collegio Germanico in Rome, where he obtained a doctorate in philosophy in 1889; finally, from 1889 until 1892, he studied at the University of Innsbruck, where he earned a doctorate in theology.

Priesthood. Ordained, June 7, 1892, in Innsbruck. From 1892 until 1898, he served at Collegio Germanico in Rome. In 1898, he returned to Brünn. Since 1898, he was chaplain at the castle of the counts of Des Fours-Walderode in Křetín, Letovice; then, in 1899, chaplain at Prosiměřice, Trstěnice; and finally, on October 29, 1901, pastor in Běhařovice, near Znojmo. Nominated to the episcopate by Emperor Francis Joseph I of Austria-Hungary on April 17, 1904.

Episcopate. Confirmed by the pope bishop of Brünn, May 14, 1904. Consecrated, June 26, 1904, in the metropolitan cathedral of Olomouc, by František Saleský Bauer, archbishop of Olomouc, Moravia, assisted by Josef Doubrava, bishop of Königgrätz (Hrádec Kralové), and by Laurentius Mayer, titular bishop of Dioclea and auxiliary of Vienna. Published in the consistory of November 14, 1904. Enthroned on June 29, 1904. In 1906, he expanded the curriculum of the Brno Diocesan Studium to include sociology. He celebrated a diocesan synod in 1909, in which, to intensify the spiritual life in the diocese, he introduced new religious communities, especially the Redemptorists, Salvatorians, Carmelites, Oblates of the Virgin Mary and Most Holy Sacrament (Eucharistiány). In 1914, he contributed to the emergence of the Congregation of the Divine Heart of Jesus in Brünn. Presented by Emperor Francis Joseph I of Austria-Hungary for the see of Prague. Promoted by the pope to the metropolitan see of Prague, Bohemia, October 4, 1916; the see carried the title of prince; published in the consistory of December 7, 1916, when he was also granted the pallium; he left the diocese of Brünn on December 7, 1916; and was enthroned in the cathedral of St. Vitus in Prague, the see of St. Adalbert, on December 8, 1916.

Cardinalate. According to Österreichisches Biographisches Lexikon 1815-1950 Online-Edition, he was created cardinal by Pope Benedict XV in the consistory of December 4, 1916 and reserved in pectore, together with Cardinal Adolf Bertram, bishop of Breslau; Archbishop Huyn was never published; Cardinal Bertram was published in the consistory of December 5, 1919. Left the archdiocese of Prague, after the proclamation of the Republic of Czechoslovakia, on November 19, 1918. Sought refuge in Zurich, Switzerland then, in the Benedictine monastery of Kreuzschwestern, in Ingebohlu. He received a letter from Pope Benedict XV dated July 16, 1919 and decided to resign his office for political reasons on September 6, 1919; his resignation was the result of anti-Catholic and anti-religious sentiments in the Czech lands after the First World War. He was transferred to the titular see of Sardica on that same date; published as such in the consistory of December 18, 1919. Promoted to the titular Latin patriarchate of Alexandria and named Assistant at the Pontifical Throne, June 13, 1921. Consultor of the SS.CC. of the Council and of Religious, December 5, 1921. Vicar of the chapter of the patriarchal Lateran basilica until November 1934. He resided in Villa S. Francesco, via del Monti Parioli, Rome, until moving to Bolzano. He was the last German archbishop of Prague.

Death. October 1, 1946, in the Benedictine abbey of Muri-Gries, in the outskirts of Bolzano, southern Tyrol, province of Bolzano-Bozen, Italy. Buried in the crypt of that monastery. Today the monastery belongs to the Congregation of The Most Holy Sacrament (Eucharistiány), which the late archbishop had introduced in the archdiocese of Prague in 1909.

Bibliography. Annuaire Pontifical Catholique de 1920. Paris : Maison de la Bonne Presse, 1920, p. 384; Annuaire Pontifical Catholique de 1934. Paris : Maison de la Bonne Presse, 1934, p. 168; L'Osservatore Romano [electronic resource]. Città del Vaticano : L'Osservatore Romano, XV, n. 232 (October 4, 1946), p. 1; Pięta, Zenonem. Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recientoris Aevi. Volumen IX (1903-1922). Patavii : Typis et Sumptibus Domus Editorialis "Il Messaggero di S. Antonio" apud Basilicam S. Antonii, 2002, pp. 45, 94, 196, 311, 331 and 355.

Links. His portrait and biography, in Czech, Wikipedia; portrait, arms and biography, in Czech, Encyklopedie města dějin Brna; biography, in Czech, Biskupství brněnské biography by PhDr. Pavel Fojtík, in Czech.

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