The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church

Biographical Dictionary
Pope Alexander VI (1492-1503)
Consistory of Friday February 19, 1496 (VI)
Celebrated at the Apostolic Palace, Rome


(17) 1. LÓPEZ, Juan (ca. 1455-1501)

Birth. Ca. 1455, Valencia, Spain. His first name is also listed as Joan and his last name as Llopis and Lopis. He was called the Cardinal of Perugia or the Cardinal of Capua.

Education. Obtained a bachelor in theology (no further educational information found).

Early life. Entered in Rome, when he was very young, the household of Cardinal Rodrigo de Borja, future Pope Alexander VI. His name appears for the first time in the Vatican Registries on October 17, 1475; he is first called familiar, and then, secretary of the cardinal. Abbreviatore di parco minore before January 28, 1481. Canon of the cathedral chapter of Valencia, February 4, 1484; and of Lérida, February 8, 1484. Canon of the chapter of the patriarchal Vatican basilica. Together with Jaime Casanova, abbreviatore, he was conclavist of Cardinal Borja in the conclave of 1484; the Sacred College charge him and two others, to redact the capitulations of the conclave. Dean of the cathedral chapter of Valencia in the pontificate of Pope Innocent VIII. Limosnero of Zaragoza, August 21, 1491.Papal datary, August 1492 until February 1496, when he was promoted to the cardinalate.

Sacred orders. (No information found).

Episcopate. Elected bishop of Perugia, December 29, 1492; retained all his benefices; kept the see until his promotion to Capua; administrator of the see of Perugia, 1499 until his death. Consecrated (no information found). In 1493, he refuted the accusations made Enrique Enríquez, majordome of King Fernando of Spain, against the pope. Named papal secretary on December 25, 1493; as a favorite of the pope and enjoying his complete trust, he exercised extraordinary missions besides the ones proper of the datary. He received from the pope numerous prebends and benefices in Spain. In December 1494, the pope asked him to intervene in the conflict with Cardinal Ascanio Sforza. From 1493, the Catholic Kings of Spain frequently requested his support when dealing with the pope. In 1495, during the invasion of Italy by King Charles VIII, he was always among the prelates convoked by Pope Alexander VII for advice and charged with negotiating, in the name of the pontiff, with the representatives of the king. At the request of King Charles VIII, the see of Carcassone was reserved for Bishop López on March 23, 1495.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of February 19, 1496; received the red hat and the title of S. Maria in Trastevere, February 24, 1496. Administrator of the see of Carcassone, December 23, 1497 until his death. Received in commendam the see of Oloren; resigned the commendam, May 28, 1498. Promoted to the metropolitan see of Capua, October 15, 1498; occupied the see until his death. He was with the pope when the ambassadors of Spain and Portugal threatened the pontiff in January 1499. Named archdeacon of Saint Paul in London on November 4, 1499. Abbot commendatario of the abbey nullius of S. Cristoforo de Castri Durantii, April 1, 1500. Abbot commendatario of the Cistercian monastery of Valledigne, diocese of Valencia, and of the Benedictine monastery of S. Sinforiano, Milan. Resigned the commendam of the monastery of Sankt Peter, Vienna, in 1500. Camerlengo of the Sacred College of Cardinals, January 1501 until his death. Archpriest of the patriarchal Vatican basilica, May 10, 1501; took possession the next day; occupied the post until his death.

Death. August 5, 1501, in his apartment at the Vatican palace, Rome (1). Buried in the patriarchal Vatican basilica, Rome, which soon was going to be demolished (2).

Bibliography. Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1793, III, 272-273; Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm ab initio nascentis Ecclesiæ vsque ad Vrbanvm VIII. Pont. Max. 2 volumes. Romae : Typis Vaticanis, 1630, II, cols. 1332 and 1346; "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936. Paris : Maison de la Bonne Presse, 1936, p.119; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen II (1431-1503). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1914; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 23, 54, 55, 56, 64, 118, 207 and 214; Goñi Gaztambide, José. "López, Juan." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España. 4 vols and Supplement. Dirigido por Quintín Aldea Vaquero, Tomás Marín Martínez, José Vives Gatell. Madrid : Instituto Enrique Flórez, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 1972-1975; Suplemento, 1987, suppl., 439-440; Storti, Nicola. La storia e il diritto della Dataria Apostolica dalle origini ai nostri giorni. Napoli : Athena Mediterranea Editrice, 1969, p. 164-165.

Link. Biographical entry, in English, Enciclopèdia.cat.

(1) Some sources say that he was poisoned by orders from Cesare Borgia, who was jealous of the cardinal's influence over his father, the pope.
(2) This is according to Cardella, Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa, III, 273; and Chacón, Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm, II, col. 1346; Ferdinando Ughelli in Italia Sacra, indicates that he was buried in the church of S. Pietro in Vincoli, about which Cardella comments that this is senza probabilità (without probability).

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(18) 2. MARTÍ, Bartolomé (ca. 1430/1440-1500)

Birth. Ca. 1430/1440, Valencia (1), Spain. His first name is also listed as Bartomeu and his last name as Martín, Martínez and Martini (2). He was called the Cardinal of Segorbe.

Education. (No information found).

Early life. Majordome of Cardinal Rodrigo de Borja, future Pope Alexander VI. Privy chamberlain of His Holiness.

Sacred orders. (No information found).

Episcopate. Elected bishop of Segorbe (3), September 27, 1473; King Juan II of Aragón had requested the appointment of another candidate for that see; an arrangement was not reached until 1478; celebrated diocesan synods in 1479 and in Xérica on June 8, 1485; resigned the government of the see in favor of his nephew Juan Marrades, bishop of Toul, November 21, 1498; he kept the faculty of return; became bishop of Segorbe again after the death of his nephew, November 1, 1499; resigned the see again in favor of his nephew Gilbert Martí, O.S.Hier., of the monastery of S. Maria de la Murta; the bulls were issued on April 23, 1500, a month after the death of the cardinal. Consecrated (no information found). Went to Rome in 1487 and remained there for the rest of his life. Received in commendam a monastery in the diocese of Urgel, August 16, 1491. Abbot commendatario of the monastery of Ambournay, archdiocese of Lyon; occupied the post until his death. Chancellor of Cardinal Borja. Majordome of the Sacred Palace, August, 1492. Master of the pontifical chapel, 1494. He had an active role in the ceremonies of the papal court but never played a political role. On January 27, 1488, he was one of the two Spanish bishops from the household of Cardinal Borja who received Cardinal Pierre de Foix, le Jeune at the entrance of Popolo, Rome. On the first Sunday of Advent 1492, he celebrated the solemn mass in the Sistine chapel in the presence of the pope and the cardinals. On December 11, 1492, several cardinals and friends of the king of Sicily went to receive Federico de Aragón, who had gone to Rome to pledge obedience to the new Pope Alexander VI in the name of his father Fernando; two prelates of the papal household went to greet him; Bishop Martí delivered the welcoming speech. King Fernando of Spain sought his influence for the success of several of his businesses in the Roman court. On December 27, 1494, feast of St. John the Evangelist, he celebrated a solemn mass in the Sistine chapel. On March 7, 1495, when the Venetian ambassador, Girolamo Giorgio, arrived in Rome, he was received by members of the papal household and the cardinals, and he rode his horse between the archbishop of Nicosia and Bishop Martí.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of February 19, 1496; received the red hat and the deaconry of S. Agata, elevated pro illa vice to title, February 24, 1496. Received the see of Bagnorea in commendam, March 2, 1497; kept the see until his death. Camerlengo of the Sacred College of Cardinals, January 9, 1499 to 1500. Bishop of Toul, 1499 until his death. On December 11, 1499, he attended the christening of Rodrigo, son of Lucrezia Borgia, in the patriarchal Vatican basilica.

Death. March 25, 1500, at midnight, after a long illness, in his house in Campo Marzio, Rome. Buried in a marble sepulchre in the patriarchal Vatican basilica, Rome, after a sumptuous funeral.

Bibliography. Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1793, III, 271-272; Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm ab initio nascentis Ecclesiæ vsque ad Vrbanvm VIII. Pont. Max. 2 volumes. Romae : Typis Vaticanis, 1630, II, col. 1332; "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936. Paris : Maison de la Bonne Presse, 1936, p. 119; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen II (1431-1503). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1914; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 23, 54, 55, 66, 101, 234 and 258; Goñi Gaztambide, José. "Martí, Bartolomé." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España. 4 vols and Supplement. Dirigido por Quintín Aldea Vaquero, Tomás Marín Martínez, José Vives Gatell. Madrid : Instituto Enrique Flórez, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 1972-1975; Suplemento, 1987, suppl., 466-467.

Link. Biographical entry, in English, Enciclopèdia.cat.

(1) This is according to "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936. Paris : Maison de la Bonne Presse, 1936, p. 119; and Cardella, Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa, III, 271; Goñi, "Martí, Bartolomé." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España, supll., 466, says that he was born in Játiva, Valencia.
(2) He was a nephew of Mateo Martí, who was married to Juana de Borja, sister of Pope Callistus III; Bartolomé was not their son, as some sources have indicated, because they did not have children, but his last name and familiarity with the Borja family since his youth suggest that relationship.
(3) Some sources confuse this see with that of Segovia.

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(19) 3. CASTRO, Juan de (1431-1506)

Birth. March 22, 1431(1), Valencia, Spain. Of a noble family. Son of Pedro Galcerán de Castre-Pinòs y Tramaced and Blanca de Só, viscountess of Évol. His first name is also listed as Giordano and his last name as Castre-Pinòs. Called the Cardinal of Agrigento.

Education. (No information found).

Early life. Cleric of the diocese of Elne. Familiar of Cardinal Rodrigo de Borja, future Pope Alexander VI. Abbot of Fossanuova.

Sacred orders. (No information found).

Episcopate. Elected bishop of Agrigento, February 19, 1479; confirmed, March 20, 1479; occupied the see until his death. Consecrated (no information found). He attended the conclave of 1484 as one of its many custodians. Named prefect of Castello Sant'Angelo, Rome, by Pope Alexander VI.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of February 19, 1496; received the red hat and the title of S. Prisca, February 24, 1496. Protector or governor of the hospitals of the Catalonians in Rome since 1496. From the time of his promotion to the cardinalate, he lived in Rome permanently, participating in the ceremonies, consistories and religious feasts and celebrating masses; he was the executor of the will of Cardinal Bartolomé Martí. Administrator of the see of Schleswig, November 6, 1499; occupied the post until July 29, 1502. On March 12, 1500, the king of Spain prohibited him from meddling in the affair of the monastery of Pedralbes, where two mother superiors disputed their authority. Abbot commendatario of the monastery of Novi Campi, diocese of S. Severino, October 14, 1500. Abbot commendatario of the Cistercian monastery of S. Maria de Gubino, diocese of Genoa. On December 27, 1502, feast of St. John the Evangelist, he could not celebrate the mass because of chiragra; he was able to celebrate on February 2, 1503, the feast of the Purification of Our Lady. Participated in the first conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Pius III. Participated in the second conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Julius II. Obtained the see of Malta in 1504 (2), despite the fact that the king of Spain had requested it for another candidate; on April 30, 1504, the king wrote to his ambassador in Rome asking him to request the resignation from the cardinal; (no information has been found about the outcome of the dispute).

Death. September 29, 1506 (3), Rome. Buried in the church of S. Maria del Popolo, Rome; his mausoleum is on the right side of the chapel of the Nativity (4).

Bibliography. Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1793, III, 272; Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm ab initio nascentis Ecclesiæ vsque ad Vrbanvm VIII. Pont. Max. 2 volumes. Romae : Typis Vaticanis, 1630, II, cols. 1332 and 1388; "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936. Paris : Maison de la Bonne Presse, 1936, p. 119; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen II (1431-1503). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1914; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 23, 64, 83 and 239; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen III (1503-1592). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1935; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, p. 243; Goñi Gaztambide, José. "Castro, Juan de." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España. 4 vols and Supplement. Dirigido por Quintín Aldea Vaquero, Tomás Marín Martínez, José Vives Gatell. Madrid : Instituto Enrique Flórez, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 1972-1975; Suplemento, 1987, I, 119-120.

Links. His tomb in the church of S. Maria del Popolo, Rome, The Australian National University; his tomb, Requiem Datenbank.

(1) This is according to his epitaph, which says that he lived 75 years, six months and seven days, and deducting it from the date of his death, September 29, 1506; Goñi, "Castro, Juan de." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España, I, 119, says that he was born on April 22, 1421; "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936, says that he was born in April 1431.
(2) This is according to Goñi, "Castro, Juan de." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España, I, 120; Eubel, Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi, III, 243, says that he was named administrator of the see of Malta on March 20, 1506 and occupied the post until his death in that same year.
(3) This is according to Goñi, "Castro, Juan de." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España, I, 119; Chacón, Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm, II, col. 1388; and Eubel, Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi, II, 83; this latter source, 23 and 64, says that he died on October 2, 1506.
(4) This is the text of his epitaph taken Requiem Datenbank, linked above:

D     O     M
IO · DECASTRO · ILLVSTRI · CITERIORIS · HISPANIAE · FAMILIA
S · PRISCAE · PRESB: CARD · AGRIGENTINO · AB · ALEXANDRO · VI.
PONT · MAX: OB CONSILIVM · HVMANITATEM · INNOCENTIAMQ.
IN · SENATVM · ASCITO · ET · IN · EO · ANNOS · X · INTEGERRIME · VERSATO
QUI · VIX: AN: LXXV: M: VI: DIEB: VII.
OL: CARRAFA · HOSTIEN · ET · IO · ANTONIVS · SABINENEN: EPISC · CARDD
EX TESTAMENTO · POS: M · D · VI
IULIO: II: PONT: MAX:


Goñi, "Castro, Juan de." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España, I, 120, erroneously says that he lived eighty five years, six months and seven days.

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(20) 4. BORJA LANZOL DE ROMANÍ, el menor, Juan (1470-1500)

Birth. 1470, Valencia, Spain. Second of the eight children of Jofré de Borja Lanzol (1), ninth baron of Villalonga, and Juana de Moncada. The other siblings were Roderic, Pere-Lluís (cardinal), Anna, Marquesa, Elionor, Jerònima and Angela. Great-grand-nephew of Pope Callistus III. Grand-nephew of Pope Alexander VI, on his mother's side. Third cousin of Cardinal Juan de Borja Lanzol de Romaní, el mayor (1492). Brother of Cardinal Pedro Luis de Borja Lanzol de Romaní (1500). Second cousin of Cardinal Cesare Borgia (1493). His first last name is also listed as Borgia and his second last name as Llançol and Llanzol. He was called the Cardinal of S. Maria in Via Lata, the Cardinal of Valencia or Cardinal Borgia.

Education. (No information found).

Early life. He was already dean of the cathedral chapter of Valencia in 1481. Governor of Spoleto in 1494. Protonotary apostolic.

Sacred orders. (No information found).

Episcopate. Elected bishop of Melfi, September 19, 1494; resigned the government of the see, December 3, 1498. Consecrated (no information found). Governor of Perugia in 1495. Nuncio to Naples. Promoted to the metropolitan see of Capua, 1496; resigned the government of the see, October 15, 1498.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal deacon in the consistory of February 19, 1496; received the red hat and the deaconry of S. María in Via Lata, February 24, 1496. Vicar of the pope in Rome. Returned to Rome through the Lateran door on December 18, 1496 and resided at the Vatican palace. On May 6, 1497, accompanied the pope to Ostia. Named legate in Perugia and Umbria in the consistory of May 22, 1497; he returned to Rome on December 2, 1497; left Rome again for Perugia, June 13, 1498. On December 19, 1498, he was sent to Viterbo, where serious problems had occurred; he returned on December 28, 1498, having been able to pacify the city. He accompanied the pope to Ostia on January 28, 1499 and returned to Rome with him on January 31st. Legate a latere to the Republic of Venice and the Venetians states, August 9, 1499; he left Rome on August 26th. Administrator of the metropolitan see of Valencia, September 6, 1499; by a notary's act of October 11, 1499, he delegated to Canons Juan Vera and Guillén Ramón Centelles to take possession of the see; occupied the see until his death; never visited the archdiocese. Abbot commendatario of the monastery of S. Maria de Paterniani until his death. Legate in Bologna, October 11, 1499, after the departure of Cardinal Ascanio Sforza; occupied the post until his death. He was also named commander of the papal troops. In January 1500, he rushed to Bologna; he was afflicted with a malignant fever in Urbino; wanting to congratulate his cousin Cesare Borgia for his victory in Forlì, he arrived in Fossombrone, where a new attack of fever afflicted him.

Death. January 17, 1500, at night, of a malignant fever, Fossombrone (2). His body was transferred to Rome and buried in the church of S. Maria del Popolo, without any funeral service or monument erected to his memory.

Bibliography. Aldea, Quintín. "Borja Lanzol de Romaní, Juan de." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España. 4 vols and Supplement. Dirigido por Quintín Aldea Vaquero, Tomás Marín Martínez, José Vives Gatell. Madrid : Instituto Enrique Flórez, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 1972-1975; Suplemento (1987), I, 279; Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1793, III, 273-274; Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm ab initio nascentis Ecclesiæ vsque ad Vrbanvm VIII. Pont. Max. 2 volumes. Romae : Typis Vaticanis, 1630, II, col. 1333 and 1345; "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936. Paris : Maison de la Bonne Presse, 1936, p. 120; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen II (1431-1503). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1914; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 23, 52, 53, 54, 55, 67, 118, 189 and 261; Weber, Christoph and Becker, Michael. Genealogien zur Papstgeschichte. 6 v. Stuttgart : Anton Hiersemann, 1999-2002. (Päpste und Papsttum, Bd. 29, 1-6), II, 78.

Links. Portrait and biography, in Spanish, archdiocese of Valencia; his genealogy, Institut d'Estudis Borgians.

(1) His name should have been Llanzol de Romaní-Borja, but his father placed first the last name Borja by imposition of his mother, a practice that happened with relative frequency at the time.
(2) This is according to "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle", Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936, p. 120; Cardella, Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa, III, 273, says that he died in Urbino and adds that others say that he died in Fossombrone; Aldea, "Borja Lanzol de Romaní, Juan de." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España, I, 120; and Chacón, Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm, II, col. 1345, say that he died in Urbino; his biography in Spanish, linked above, says that he died in Urbina, while travelling to Rome.

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