The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church

Biographical Dictionary
Pope Alexander VI (1492-1503)
Consistory of September 28, 1500 (IX)
Celebrated at St. Peter's basilica, Rome


(25) 1. SERRA I CAU, Jaime (ca.1427-1430-1517)

Birth. Ca.1427-1430, Valencia. Of Catalonian origin (1). His first name is also listed as Jaume.

Education. Magister in theology.

Early life. Between 1455 and 1458, he obtained several ecclesiastical benefices from Pope Callistus III. Notary in the Roman court. Between 1472 and 1475, he maintained close epistolar contact with Lianoro di Lianori, nuncio and pontifical collector in Spain. Protonotary apostolic. Apostolic treasurer. Canon of the cathedral chapter of Valencia. He advised Cardinal Rodrigo de Borja, future Pope Alexander VI, concerning the purchase of the duchy of Gandía and the marriage of his son Giovanni to María Enríquez, cousin of King Ferdinand II. Domestic prelate of Pope Alexander VI.

Sacred orders. (No information found).

Episcopate. Elected archbishop of Oristano, April 11, 1492; resigned the government of the see in favor of his nephew Pedro Serra de Muñoz, December 9, 1510. Consecrated (no information found). Abbotcommendatario of San Bernardo, Valencia, August 1492. Vicar of the pope in Rome, 1496 until his promotion to the cardinalate. Pope Alexander VI planned to charge him with the peace negotiations between the Holy League and France but they were postponed. Abbot commendatario of the monastery of S. Benedetto di Gualdo, diocese of Nocera, August 23, 1500.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of September 28, 1500; he was published and received the red hat, October 2, 1500; and the title of S. Vitale, October 5, 1500. In the consistory of November 27, 1500, he was named legate in Perugia; returned to Rome from his legation on April 21, 1501; returned to Perugia on December 3, 1502; occupied the post until the death of the pope. Legate in Marche and Umbria. Administrator of the see of Linköping, Sweden, September 3, 1501; never resided in the diocese and resigned its government on April 6, 1513. Opted for the title of S. Clemente, June 28, 1502. Participated in the first conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Pius III. Participated in the second conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Julius II. Abbot commendatario of the Celestine monastery of S. Michele di Formicar diocese of Volterra, 1505. Abbot commendatario of Santa Maria de Ripoll, 1506 until his death. Administrator of the see of Elne, September 5, 1506; he received an indult to obtain the rents although he resided in Rome; resigned the government of the see on March 19, 1513. In 1506, he instituted in Rome the confraternity of Montserrat. Abbot commendatario of San Miguel de Cuxà, 1507 to 1511. Cardinal protoprete, June 1509. Opted for the order of cardinal bishops and the suburbicarian see of Albano, January 20, 1511. He was present in all the first ten sessions of the Fifth Lateran Council, except the eighth. Administrator of the see of Burgos, July 28, 1512; although King Fernando had requested for him the first Spanish diocese that would become vacant, the monarch now opposed the nomination alleging that the pope had made it before receiving the royal supplication; the cardinal resigned the see before July 5, 1514, without ever having taken possession. Participated in the conclave of 1513, which elected Pope Leo X. Received numerous benefices, canonships and rents in Italy and Spain. Administrator of the see of Calahora, July 5, 1514; resigned the government of the see, May 25, 1515. Opted for the suburbicarian see of Palestrina, July 1516 (2). Died during the last session of the Fifth Lateran Council.

Death. March 15, 1517, Rome. Buried initially in the main chapel of the church of S. Giacomo degli Spagnoli, Rome; later, his remains were transferred to a mausoleum built by him in a chapel of Santiago that he founded in that church (3). He established a memorial of eight monthly masses and three sung anniversaries for the repose of his soul. The executor of his will was Cardinal Antonio Maria Ciocchi del Monte.

Bibliography. Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1793, III, 281; Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm ab initio nascentis Ecclesiæ vsque ad Vrbanvm VIII. Pont. Max. 2 volumes. Romae : Typis Vaticanis, 1630, II, col. 1335, 1432 and 1439; "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936, Paris : Maison de la Bonne Presse, 1936, p. 123; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen II (1431-1503). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1914; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 24, 55, 56, 62, 65, 92 and 178; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen III (1503-1592). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1935; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 55, 57, 142, 192 and 225; Goñi Gaztambide, José. Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España. 4 vols and Supplement. Dirigido por Quintín Aldea Vaquero, Tomás Marín Martínez, José Vives Gatell. Madrid : Instituto Enrique Flórez, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 1972-1975; Suplemento (1987), IV, 2438-2439; Weber, Christoph and Becker, Michael. Genealogien zur Papstgeschichte. 6 v. Stuttgart : Anton Hiersemann, 1999-2002. (Päpste und Papsttum, Bd. 29, 1-6), III, 76.

Webgraphy. Biographical entry, in English, Gran Enciclopèdia Catalana; La branca noble dels Borja de Xátiva, Institut d'Estudis Borgians; his arms, Araldica Vaticana.

(1) According to Goñi, Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España, IV 2438, citing Fernando Bujanda, Episcopologio calagurritano (Logroño, 1944), p. 411-412; and Weber, Genealogien zur Papstgeschichte, III, 76, he was the son of Bartolomé Serra and Juana Borja, sister of Pope Callistus III and aunt of Pope Alexander VI; his biography in Catalonian, linked above, says that her name was Joana Gil de Borja i Escrivà, that she was not a sister of Pope Callistus III and that she was the aunt of Pope Alexander VI; according to Weber, III, 76, she was the sister-in-law of Pope Callistus III. He was not, as Bujanda says, son of Bartolomé Serra y Juana Borja, because they did not have children, as shown in "La branca noble dels Borja de Xativa", linked above; besides, Juana Borja was not the sister of Pope Callistus III, who married Mateo Martm, but the sister of the the father of Pope Alexander VI (this pope's aunt). Neither one of those Juana Borja had children. It is probable, although not certain, that Cardinal Jaime was a nephew of Bartolomé Serra and thus related but not direct family of the Borgias.
(2) This is according to Francesco Cristofori, Cronotasi dei cardinali di Santa Romana Chiesa. (Rome : Tipografia de Propaganda Fide, 1888), p. 21; Eubel, Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi, III, 57, says that he was bishop of Albano until his death and does not list him among the bishops of Palestrina.
(3) This is the text of his epitaph taken from the addition of Andrea Vittorelli in Chacón, Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm, II, 1335: D. O. M. IACOBO. SERRÆ. EPISCOPO PRÆNESTINO. SANCTÆ. ROMANÆ. ECCLESIÆ. CARDINALI. ARBORENSI. ANTONIVS. DE. MONT. SNACTÆ. PRAXEDIS. EXECVTOR. EX. TESTAMENTO. P.

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(26) 2. ISVALIES, Pietro (?-1511)

Birth. (No date found), Messina, Sicily. Of an obscure family of Spanish origin. His last name is also listed as Isuales; as Isualles; as Isuali; as Isuagles; as Isuaglies; as Isvales; as Isvalíes; as Suaglio; and as Desvalis. His first name is also listed as Jaume. He was called the Cardinal of Oristano. The Spanish sources call him Isvallies y Ríjoles, but the second last name is a corruption of the name of his archdiocese, Reggio.

Education. (No information found).

Early life. Canon of the cathedral chapter of Messina; later, vicar general of the see. He went to Rome and was named protonotary apostolic. Governor of Rome, August 11, 1496 until his promotion to the cardinalate.

Sacred orders. (No information found).

Episcopate. Elected archbishop of Reggio Calabria, February 18, 1497; resigned the government of the see on July 24, 1506 in favor of his nephew Francesco (1). Consecrated, June 4, 1497, Sistine chapel, by Bartolomé Flores, archbishop of Cosenza, secretary of the pope. In the same ceremony were consecrated the coadjutor of the archbishop of Spoleto, the bishop of Chiusi, and two other bishops. He was created cardinal at the request of King Ferdinando II of Sicily.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of September 28, 1500; he was published and received the red hat on October 2, 1500; and the title of S. Ciriaco, October 5, 1500. Legate a latere before the kings of Hungary and Poland, October 5, 1500; left for his legation, Novermber 16, 1500, after the consistory held on that day; he returned that evening to his Roman house; and went to see the pope on the evening of November 19th, and then left definitively. Administrator of the see of Veszprém, June 21, 1503; occupied the post until his death. Did not participate in the first conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Pius III. Participated in the second conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Julius II. Opted for the title of S. Pudenziana, August 18, 1507; retained in commendam until his death the title of S. Ciriaco. In 1508, he obtained an indult to be able to resign or exchange his benefices in Rome. Administrator of the see of Orense, June 7, 1508; occupied the post until his death. Protector of the kingdom of Poland, May 1, 1510. Administrator of the metropolitan see of Messina, 1510; occupied the post until his death. On January 2, 1511, he accompanied the pope to the walls of Mirandola; the siege capitulated on January 20, 1511. Named in Ravenna on May 24, 1511, legate in Bologna and Romagna; succeeded Cardinal Francesco Alidosi, who had been killed on that same day. Archpriest of the patriarchal Liberian basilica, Rome.

Death. Monday September 22, 1511, Cesena (2). Buried in the patriarchal Liberian basilica, Rome.

Bibliography. Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1793, III, 283-285; Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm ab initio nascentis Ecclesiæ vsque ad Vrbanvm VIII. Pont. Max. 2 volumes. Romae : Typis Vaticanis, 1630, II, col. 1335 and 1390; Del Re, Niccolò. Monsignor governatore di Roma. Rome : Istituto di Studi Romani Editore, 1972, p. 70; "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936. Paris : Maison de la Bonne Presse, 1936, p. 123-124; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen II (1431-1503). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1914; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 24, 55, 62, 222 and 266; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen III (1503-1592). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1935; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 62, 69, 124 and 242; Guitarte Izquierdo, Vidal. Episcopologio Español (1500-1699). Españoles obispos en España, América, Filipinas y otros países. Rome : Instituto Español de Historia Eclesiástica, 1994. (Publicaciones del Instituto Español de Historia Eclesiástica; Subsidia; 34), p. 312.

Webgraphy. Biographical entry, in Hungarian, Magyar Elektronikus Köyutár (Hungarian Electronic Library); biographical data, in Italian, Consorzio BAICR Sistema Cultura; his arms, Araldica Vaticana.

(1) This is according to "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle", Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936, p. 124; his biographical data in Italian, linked above, says that Francesco was his brother.
(2) This is according to "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle", Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936, p. 124; Cardella, Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa, III, 285; and his biographical entry in Hungarian, linked above; Del Re, Monsignor governatore di Roma, p. 70; and his biographical data, linked above, say that he died in Ravenna.

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(27) 3. BORJA, Francisco de (1441-1511)

Birth. 1441, Játiva (1), Spain. He is also listed as Francesc de Borja; and his last name as Borgia. He was called the Cardinal of Cosenza.

Education. (No information found).

Early life. Canon of the cathedral chapter of Valencia. Went to Rome after the election of Pope Alexander VI, who named him protonotary apostolic; and later, treasurer general on September 20, 1493.

Sacred orders. (No information found).

Episcopate. Elected bishop of Teano, August 19, 1495; resigned the see on June 5, 1508 in favor of his nephew Francisco de Borja. Consecrated (no information found). Abbot commendatario of the monasteries of S. Vincenzo, Volturno, and of S. Stefano di Sermo, diocese of Terracina, August 19, 1495. Promoted to the metropolitan see of Cosenza, keeping the administration of Teano, November 6, 1499.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of September 28, 1500; he was published and received the red hat on October 2, 1500; received the title of S. Cecilia, October 5, 1500. Legate in Campagna, 1501; left Rome on June 22, 1501 to take possession in the name of the pope of Rocca di Papa and other territories and castles from the Colonna. In 1502, he accompanied Lucrezia Borgia to Ferrara for her marriage to Prince Alfonso d'Este. Pope Alexander VI named him tutor of his youngest son, Giovanni Borgia, called the Infante Romano, whom the pope had just named duke of Camerino. Camerlengo of the Sacred College of Cardinals, January 1503 to 1504; on March 10, he issued an ordinance to recover the debts owed to the college. Participated in the first conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Pius III. Participated in the second conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Julius II. Opted for the title of Ss. Nereo ed Achilleo, August 11, 1506. He joined a plot of cardinals against Pope Julius II and wrote from Ferrara against the pontiff; in October 1510, he went to Milan via Florence and Pavia; he signed the document on March 16, 1511 convoking the pope to a council in Pisa; he was deposed as cardinal and excommunicated by Pope Julius II on October 24, 1511; he could not go to Pisa and gave full powers to the other five cardinals who convoked the council. Together with him were deposed and excommunicated Cardinals Federico di Sanseverino, Bernardino López de Carvajal, Guillaume Briçonnet, and René de Prie; these were pardoned and reinstated by Pope Leo X in 1513 but by then, Cardinal Borja had already died. Cardinal protoprete in January 1511.

Death. November 4, 1511, suddenly, Reggio, while traveling to Pisa, without knowing that he had been deposed and excommunicated (3). Buried in Reggio Emilia.

Bibliography. Aldea Vaquero, Quintín. "Borja, Francisco de." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España. 4 vols and Supplement. Dirigido por Quintín Aldea Vaquero, Tomás Marín Martínez, José Vives Gatell. Madrid : Instituto Enrique Flórez, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 1972-1975; Suplemento (1987), I, 279; Batllori, Miguel. "Borja, Familia." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España. 4 vols and Supplement. Dirigido por Quintín Aldea Vaquero, Tomás Marín Martínez, José Vives Gatell. Madrid : Instituto Enrique Flórez, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 1972-1975; Suplemento (1987), I, 275-276; Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1793, III, 285-286; Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm ab initio nascentis Ecclesiæ vsque ad Vrbanvm VIII. Pont. Max. 2 volumes. Romae : Typis Vaticanis, 1630, II, col. 1336; "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936, Paris : Maison de la Bonne Presse, 1936, p. 124; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen II (1431-1503). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1914; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 67, 84, 183 and 311.

Webgraphy. Biographical entry, in English, Gran Enciclopèdia Catalana; his image in the painting "Virgen de las Fiebres" by Bernardino de Betto Bardi, il Pinturicchio, Museo de Bellas Artes "San Pio V", Valencia, Spain; his portrait and arms, Araldica Vaticana; his genealogy, in Catalonian, from Institut de Estudis Borgians; and D. Rodrigo de Borja (Alejandro VI). Sus hijos y descendientes, in Spanish, by Manuel Oliver, Real Academia de la Historia.

(1) This is according to Aldea, "Borja, Francisco de." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España, I, 279; his biographical entry in English, linked above, says that he was born in Xátiva (Játiva ) in the middle of the 16th century; "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle", Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936, p. 124; Cardella, Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa, III, 285; and Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm, II, col. 1336, say that he was born in Savina, near Valencia.
(2) Aldea, "Borja, Francisco de." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España, I, 279, indicates that he was the natural son of Alonso de Borja, future Pope Callistus III, and adds that he was born before his father received the sacred orders; Cardella, Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa, III, 285; and "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle", Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936, p. 124; his biographical entry in English, linked above, says that his father is unknown and that since the 16th century it has been falsely thought that he was an illegitimate son of Alfonso de Borja, Pope Callistus III; his genealogy, linked above, indicates that his parents are unknown; and Oliver, "D. Rodrigo de Borja (Alejandro VI). Sus hijos y descendientes", linked above, says, in the second genealogy, that he was the son of Juan de Borja, who was the son of Rodrigo Gil de Borja (grandfather of Pope Alexander VI), and his second wife and therefore, only brother by father of the father of that pope; Batllori, "Borja, Familia," Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España, I, 275, says that he was the brother of Cardinal Juan de Borja Lanzol de Romaní, el mayor, and thus, son of Pedro-Guillén Lanzol de Romaní and Juana Borja, eldest sister of Pope Alexander VI.
(3) This is according to "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936, p. 124; Aldea, "Borja, Francisco de." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España, I, 279, says that it seems that the news of his deposition was the cause of his death.

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(28) 4. VERA, Juan de (1453-1507)

Birth. November 25, 1453, castle of Alcira (now Alzira), La Ribera Alta, diocese of Valencia, Spain. His first name is also listed as Joan. Relative of Pope Alexander VI. He was called the Cardinal of Salerno.

Education. From a very young age he dedicated himself to studying; obtained a doctorate in both canon and civil law (no further information educational found).

Early life. In Rome, he entered the service of Cardinal Rodrigo de Borja, future Pope Alexander VI, and was the preceptor of Cesare, the cardinal's son; later, he was the cardinal's vicar in Valencia.

Sacred orders. (No information found).

Episcopate. Elected archbishop of Salerno, July 10, 1500; occupied the see until his death. Consecrated (no information found). Legate to the kings of Aragón, Castile, Portugal, France, and England to promote the crusade.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of September 28, 1500; he was published and received the red hat, October 2, 1500; and the title of S. Balbina, October 5, 1500. In the consistory of October 5, 1500, he was named legate before the kings of Spain, Portugal, France, and England to promote the crusade. Legate in Marche Anconitana, 1501; returned to Rome from this legation on November 13th. Received a canonship in Burgos in 1503. Participated in the first conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Pius III. Participated in the second conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Julius II. Canon of the cathedral chapter of Burgos, 1503-1504. Camerlengo of the Sacred College of Cardinals, 1504 to 1505. Prior of the collegiate church of San Pedro de Fraga, Léria, and pastor of Badieles, Zaragoza, August 7, 1504. Administrator of the see of León, May 14, 1505; since the pope had named the bishop without the consent of King Fernando of Spain, the latter, fearful of the king's wrath, refused to accept the post; at first, the king confiscated the cardinal's rents and benefices but later, realizing that the nomination had not been accepted, he offered the bishop the see of León if he would take charge of the royal businesses at the Roman curia; new difficulties arose for the cardinal when Prince Felipe "el Hermoso" opposed his nomination to León and the cardinal died before the matter was resolved without having taken possession of that see. Governor of Piceno and of Emilia.

Death. May 4, 1507, Rome, he was fifty-three years, five months and nine days of age. Buried in a marble sepulchre in the chapel of S. Monica of the church of S. Agostino, Rome.

Bibliography. Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1793, III, 286-287; Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm ab initio nascentis Ecclesiæ vsque ad Vrbanvm VIII. Pont. Max. 2 volumes. Romae : Typis Vaticanis, 1630, II, col. 1336 and 1388; "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936, Paris : Maison de la Bonne Presse, 1936, p. 124; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen II (1431-1503). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1914; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 23, 55, 56, 61, 84 and 227; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen III (1503-1592). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1935; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 221 and 289; Goñi Gaztambide. "Vera, Juan." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España. 4 vols and Supplement. Dirigido por Quintín Aldea Vaquero, Tomás Marín Martínez, José Vives Gatell. Madrid : Instituto Enrique Flórez, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 1972-1975; Suplemento (1987), IV, 2732-2733; Guitarte Izquierdo, Vidal. Episcopologio Español (1500-1699). Españoles obispos en España, América, Filipinas y otros países. Rome : Instituto Español de Historia Eclesiástica, 1994. (Publicaciones del Instituto Español de Historia Eclesiástica; Subsidia; 34), p. 17.

Webgraphy. Biographical entry, in English, Hiperenciclopedia; his tomb, chapel of S. Monica in the church of S. Agostino, Rome, Requiem Datenbank; his engraving and arms, Araldica Vaticana.

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(29) 5. PODOCATHOR, Ludovico (1429-1504)

Birth. 1429, Nicosia, Cyprus. Of a noble Greek family. His name is also listed as Felonies; and his last name as Podochatero; as Podocatharo; as Podocatharus; as Podacatharus; as Podocathro; as Podocataro; and as Podo Catharus. He was called the Cardinal of Capaccio and the Cardinal of Nicosia.

Education. In Ferrara, he studied Greek and Latin under Guarino; philosophy under Gaetano Thiene di Vicenza; and medicine under Matteolo da Perugia in Padua. He was considered an eminent scholar.

Early life. Because of the events in Cyprus, he went to Italy at a very young age. He later went back to Cyprus and returned to Italy definitively in 1478, this time accompanied by Queen Carlota de Lusignan. Rector of the University of Padua. Abbreviatore di parco minore in the pontificate of Pope Sixtus IV. Secretary and physician of Cardinal Rodrigo de Borja, future Pope Alexander VI.

Sacred orders. (No information found).

Episcopate. Elected bishop of Capacio, November 14, 1483; occupied the post until January 20, 1503. Consecrated (no information found). Pope Innocent VIII called him to Rome and made him his physician and papal secretary.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of September 28, 1500; he was published and received the red hat on October 2, 1500; and the deaconry of S. Agata in Suburra, elevated pro illa vice to title, October 5, 1500. Secretary of Apostolic Briefs or of the Apostolic Signature. Abbot commendatario of San Gallo de Moggio, archdiocese of Aquileia, October 5, 1502. Promoted to the metropolitan see of Benevento, January 20, 1503; he did not occupy the see; on January 8, 1504, he was named its administrator. Participated in the first conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Pius III. Participated in the second conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Julius II. He had a rich collection of books and manuscripts which he left to his nephew Livio Podocator, bishop of Nicosia; they are now part of the "Biblioteca Marciana" of Venice.

Death. August 25, 1504, Milan (1), while traveling to Spain. Transferred to Rome and buried in an elegant mausoleum, sculpted by Gian Cristoforo Romano, in a chapel he had founded in the church of S. Maria del Popolo, Rome (2). The mausoleum was commissioned by his nephew Livio on the right wall near the sacristy; it has the statue of the cardinal in pontifical habit. Another inscription was placed in 1504 on the left wall of the chapel of S. Lucia in his cardinalitial title.

Bibliography. Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1793, III, 287-288; Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm ab initio nascentis Ecclesiæ vsque ad Vrbanvm VIII. Pont. Max. 2 volumes. Romae : Typis Vaticanis, 1630, II, col. 1336 and 1388; "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936. Paris : Maison de la Bonne Presse, 1936, p. 125; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen II (1431-1503). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1914; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 24, 66, 104 and 118; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen III (1503-1592). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1935; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, p. 132; Orazi Ausenda, Renata. "Podocatharo, Ludovico." Enciclopedia Cattolica. 12 vols. Città del Vaticano : Ente per l'Enciclopedia cattolica e per il Libro cattolico, 1948-1954, IV, col. 1644-1645.

Webgraphy. His tomb, Requiem Datenbank; his engraving and arms, Araldica Vaticana.

(1) This is according to "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936, p. 125; Orazi Ausenda, "Podocatharo, Ludovico." Enciclopedia Cattolica, col. 1644, says that he died in Rome.
(2) This is the text of his epitaph taken from Andrea Vittorelli's addition to Chacón, Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm, II, 1388:

LVDOVICO. PODOCATHARO. CYPRIO.
PRESB. TITVLI. S. AGATHÆ. CARDINALI. CAPVTAQVENSI. NVNCVPATO.
PHILOSOPHOPHORVM. ILLIVS. TEMPORIS. DOCTISSIMO. IN. RE.
ECCLESIASTICA. GVBERNANDA. MVLTOS. ANNOS. DIFFICILLIMIS.
TEMPORIBVS. SVMMA. PRUDENTIÆ. IVDICII, INTEGRIRATIS. LAVDE.
VERSATO. EIVSQVE. ERGO. AMPLISSIMÆ. DIGNITATIS. PRÆMIA. OPTIMIS.
PATRVM. QVIBVSQ. EXPOSTVLANTIBVS. ADEPTO. DIGNOO. OMNIVM.
SENTENTIA. MAIORA. ACCIPERE. QVI. MAXIMA. ESSET. CONSECVTVS. VIXIT. ANNOS. LXXV.

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(30) 6. TRIVULZIO, seniore, Can. Reg. of Sant'Antonio, Antonio (1449-1508)

Birth. January 18, 1457, Milan. Son of Pietro Trivulzio and Laura Bossi. Milanese patrician. His first name is also listed as Giovanni and his last name as Trivulce. Uncle of Cardinal Agostino Trivulzio (1517). Brother of Teodoro Trivulzio, marshal of France. Other cardinals members of the family were Scaramuccia Trivulzio (1517); Antonio Trivulzio, iuniore (1557); Giangiacomo Teodoro Trivulzio (1629). He was called the Cardinal of Como.

Education. Obtained a doctorate in law. Joined the Canons Regular of Sant'Antonio.

Early life. Privy counselor to Duke Giovanni Galeazzo of Milan.

Priesthood. Ordained ( no further information found). Master of the Augustinian house of S. Antonio, Milan. Ambassador of Milan in Parma, 1477; and in Rome in 1483. Protonotary apostolic. Auditor of the Sacred Roman Rota.

Episcopate. Elected bishop of Como, August 27, 1487; occupied the see until his death. Consecrated (no information found). Ambassador of Milan in Venice, 1495. Member of the Regents of Milan, 1499. Dean of the chapter of the cathedral of Saint Donatien of Brugge, between 1499 and 1502. He aligned himself with the French in their campaign in Italy. Promoted to the cardinalate at the request of King Louis XII of France.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of September 28, 1500; he was published and received the red hat on October 2, 1500; and the title of S. Anastasia, October 5, 1500. Senator of Milan, 1500. Arrived in Rome on September 3, 1503. Participated in the first conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Pius III. Participated in the second conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Julius II. Camerlengo of the Sacred College of Cardinals, 1505 to 1506. Opted for the title of S. Stefano al Monte Celio, December 1, 1505. Opted for another title, which name is not known, January 4, 1507.

Death. March 18, 1508 (1), Rome. Buried in the church of S. Maria del Popolo, Rome (2). Cardinal Giangiacomo Teodoro Trivulzio placed an inscription to his memory in 1654 on the third column on the left side of that church.

Bibliography. Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1793, III, 288-289; Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm ab initio nascentis Ecclesiæ vsque ad Vrbanvm VIII. Pont. Max. 2 volumes. Romae : Typis Vaticanis, 1630, II, col. 1336 and 1389; "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936. Paris : Maison de la Bonne Presse, 1936, p. 125; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen II (1431-1503). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1914; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 24, 56, 61 and 140; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen III (1503-1592). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1935; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 59, 70 and 84.

Webgraphy. The Trivulzio family, in English, Web Gallery of Art, created by Emil Kren and Daniel Marx; his arms, Araldica Vaticana.

(1) This is according to "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936, p. 123; and the deduction from his epitaph in Chacón, Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm, II, 1398, transcribed in note 2; Eubel, Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi, II, 25, says that he died on March 16, 1508.
(2) Text of his epitaph taken from the addition of Andrea Vittorelli to Chacón, Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm, II, 1389: ANTONIO. TRIVVLZIO. MEDIOLANENSI. SVMMÆ. NOBILITATIS. INTEGRITATISQ. VIRO. AC. S. R. E. PRESB. CARD. COMENSI. QVI. VIXIT. ANNOS. LI. MENSIS II. OBIT. XV. KALEND. APRILIS. MDVIII. IVLIO. SECVNDO. PONT. MAX.

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(31) 7. FERRARI, Giovanni Battista (1450-1502)

Birth. 1450 (1), Modena. Of a distinguished and poor family. Son of Giovanni Ferrari and Verde Alberghetti. He was called the Cardinal of Modena and the Cardinal of Capua.

Education. Initial studies and belle lettere in Modena. Obtained a doctorate in law in Padua.

Early life. Entered the ecclesiastical state a young age. Went to Rome under the protection of Cardinal Rodrigo de Borja, future Pope Alexander VI; the cardinal procured for him a benefice in the cathedral of Modena and a canonship in its cathedral chapter. Likewise, the cardinal obtained from Pope Callistus III his appointment as solicitor, writer and corrector of apostolic letters. Named in 1471 one of the twelve abbreviatori of the apostolic letters; in 1482, he was promoted to abbreviatore di parco maggiore. Secretary of King Juan II of Aragón for a brief time. In 1495, Pope Alexander VI named him assistant to the pontifical vice-chancellor for the issuance of apostolic letters; and later, referendary.

Sacred orders. (No information found).

Episcopate. Elected bishop of Modena, September 11, 1495; because of his duties in the Roman curia, he could not reside in Modena and governed the diocese through vicars general. Consecrated (no information found). Papal datary from April 1496 to his promotion to the cardinalate; pro-datary until his death. Regent of the Apostolic Chancery.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of September 28, 1500; he was published and received the red hat, October 2, 1500; and the title of S. Crisogono on October 5, 1500. Promoted to the metropolitan see of Capua, August 9, 1501. Abbot commendatario of the monastery of S. Pietro di Rivalba, diocese of Turin, until his death. On July 6, 1502, he became ill from the poison administered by his master of chamber, Sebastiano Pinzoni; on the following day, he took a turn for the worse and received the last rites; he died thirteen days later; the master of chamber was executed in the pontificate of Pope Leo X.. He left a large fortune which ended up mostly in the hands of Pope Alexander VI.

Death. July 20, 1502, Vatican palace, Rome. The funeral, celebrated by Cardinal Francisco de Borja, took place in the patriarchal Vatican basilica; the funeral oration was delivered by Camillo Procari. Buried in the patriarchal Vatican basilica. On July 27, 1502, his remains were transferred to Modena by his brother Francesco, who succeeded the late cardinal in that see the same day of his death, and buried in the chapel of the Madona delle Febbri, next to the pillar between the altar of the Madona and that of S. Callisto, in its cathedral. Later, his remains were placed in the tomb of his brother Bishop Francesco above the Western main door, with the arms of Pope Alexander VI and the two brothers, and supported by two marble lions (2).

Bibliography. Bernabei, Nicola. Vita del Cardinale Giovanni Morone, vescovo di Modena e biografie dei Cardinali Modenesi e di Casa d'Este, dei cardinali vescovi di Modena e di quelli educati in questo Collegio di San Carlo. Modena : Tipografica Rossi, 1885, pp. 151-156; Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1793, III, 289-291; Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm ab initio nascentis Ecclesiæ vsque ad Vrbanvm VIII. Pont. Max. 2 volumes. Romae : Typis Vaticanis, 1630, II, col. 1336-1337 and 1346; "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936. Paris : Maison de la Bonne Presse, 1936, p. 125; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen II (1431-1503). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1914; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 24, 56, 62, 118 and 198; Storti, Nicola. La storia e il diritto della Dataria Apostolica dalle origini ai nostri giorni. Napoli : Athena Mediterranea Editrice, 1969, p.165.

Webgraphy. His arms, Araldica Vaticana.

(1) This is according to "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936, p. 125; Bernabei, Vita del Cardinale Giovanni Morone, vescovo di Modena e biografie dei Cardinali Modenesi, p. 151, says that he was born in 1451.
(2) Text of the inscription on his tomb taken from Bernabei, Vita del Cardinale Giovanni Morone, vescovo di Modena e biografie dei Cardinali Modenesi, p. 155:


Hic situs antistes Capuae venerabilis, atque
Maxima Ferrariae Gloria, spesque Domus,
Qui pariter Praesul Mutinae, rutilante Galero
Grisogoni titulos, sacraque signa tulit.
Ioannes Bapotrista fuit, cui nomen, et idem
In quo prisca fides Religionis erat;
Cujus Alexander Romanus Pastor agebat
Sextus consilio grandia quaeque suo.
Hic illi Frater Patria successor in isto
Frasnciscus pario marmore clausus adest.

Hercules de Ferrariis fieri fecit 1510.

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(32) 8. BAKÓCZ, Tamás (1442-1521)

Birth. 1442, Erdőd, diocese of Veszprém, Hungary. Of a poor family. His father was a wagoner and he was adopted by a relative, Bálint Bákocz, who was a priest and who trained him for the priesthood. He was called the Cardinal of Strigonia (Esztergom).

Education. Initial studies in Szatmár-Németi; later, in Kraków (obtained a bachelor's degree in 1464), Ferrara and Padua (obtained a doctorate in 1470).

Early life. Cleric of Eger. Secretary of Bishop Gabriel Rangoni, future cardinal, in 1475; he had followed the bishop in the assault of Breslau in 1474, where he met King Matthias Corvin of Hungary. Named by the king notary of the royal chancery; and later, royal secretary and provost of Tétel, 1480; he succeeded his uncle in that post.

Sacred orders. (No information found).

Episcopate. Elected bishop of Györ, April 20, 1487. Consecrated (no information found). Played an important role in the election of King Wladislas II in 1490. Named chancellor of the kingdom of Hungary in 1490; as such, he was in effect the real ruler of his country; occupied the post until his death. Abbot commendatario of Pannonhalma, 1490-1492. Transferred to the see of Eger, June 9, 1497; he had been named to that see by the king of Hungary in 1491; the pope had named Ascanio Maria Sforza for the same see; there was a dispute that was not solved until six years later. Promoted to the metropolitan and primatial see of Esztergom, December 20, 1497. Promoted to the cardinalate at the request of the king of Hungary.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of September 28, 1500; he was published on October 2, 1500 in his absence; received the title of Ss. Silvestro e Martino, October 5, 1500. He obtained that in May 1501, Hungary allied itself with the pope, Venice and Spain for the war against the Turks. Did not participate in the first conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Pius III. Did not participate in the second conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Julius II. On January 28, 1506, he obtained and indult to confer ecclesiastical benefices. Named titular Latin patriarch of Constantinople, October 30, 1507. In May 1509, he received from Venice the order of convoking a council against the pope but he refused. In 1511, he made Hungary remain neutral in the fight between Venice and the League of Cambrai, formed by the pope, France, Spain, and Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian. In 1510, several cardinals rebelled against Pope Julius II; both parties tried to win him over; the cardinal kept a waiting attitude; when in the following year, 1511, the pope deposed and excommunicated those cardinals and condemned the schismatic Council of Pisa and announced that he would hold the V Lateran Council in 1512, Cardinal . Bakócz sided with the pope. Cardinal protoprete, November 1511. Called by Pope Julius II, he went to Rome at the beginning of 1512 with a magnificent retinue but did not participate in the consistory of January 30, 1512. On May 17, 1512, he celebrated the pontifical mass in the second session of the V Lateran Council. On November 5, 1512, he went before Mathieu Lang, representative of Emperor Maximilian I, future cardinal, and accompanied him to the gate of Popolo. On March 4, 1513, he celebrated the mass of the Holy Spirit in the chapel of S. Andrea, because the patriarchal Vatican basilica was under reconstruction. He was member of the council's committee for the reform of the church and the Roman curia. Participated in the conclave of 1513, which elected Pope Leo X. On May 12, 1513, the new pope gave him in commendam the canonships and parochial churches of Sankt Cunibert and Sankt Severin in Cologne; and the parish of Erkelenz, diocese of Liège. Legate a latere in Hungary, Bohemia and Poland to promote the crusade against the Turks, July 15, 1513; at the same time, he was appointed apostolic visitor to all the monasteries of both men and women religious. On September 20, 1513, he received a special instruction from the pope to restore the unity of the Bohemian clergy; he left Rome for Hungary on November 9, 1513; on his way, he apparently visited the Shrine of Loreto; his efforts for the promotion of the crusade did not succeed; the nobles opposed the project and it ended in a fight between them and the crusaders, in which the nobility was victorious; on June 19, 1518, the pope extended his legation for another year. He appeased a revolt against King Louis II, who had succeeded his father King Wladislas II in 1516; after the death of the king, the cardinal's influenced waned considerably and he spent his final years almost in a complete retirement. He had Italian architects built the chapel of Corpus Christi in Esztergom, transported stone by stone to the new cathedral consecrated in 1856; the altar of the chapel was carved from red marble by Andrea Ferrucci, a sculptor from Fiesole in 1519.

Death. June 11, 1521 (1), Esztergom. Buried in the Bakócz chapel in the primatial and metropolitan cathedral of Esztergom.

Bibliography. Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1793, III, 281-285; Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm ab initio nascentis Ecclesiæ vsque ad Vrbanvm VIII. Pont. Max. 2 volumes. Romae : Typis Vaticanis, 1630, II, col. 1335 and ; "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936. Paris : Maison de la Bonne Presse, 1936, p. 126; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen II (1431-1503). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1914; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 24, 65, 3, 167 and 242; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen III (1503-1592). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1914; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, p. 304; Tusor, Péter. Purpura Pannonica : az esztergomi "bíborosi szék" kialakulásának elozminyei a 17. században = Purpura Pannonica : the "Cardinalitial See" of Strigonium and its Antecedens in the 17th Century. Budapest : Róma : Research Institute of Church History at Péter Pázmány Catholic University, 2005. (Collectanea Vaticana Hungariae, Classis I, vol. 3.; Variation: Collectanea Vaticana Hungariae ; Classis I, vol. 3), 44, 46, 49, 198, 210 and 317.

Webgraphy. Biography by Francis Schaefer, in English, The Catholic Encyclopedia; biography, in English, Wikipedia; biography, in Hungarian, Magyar Elektronikus Köyutár (Hungarian Electronic Library); biographical entry, in Italian, Sapere; his image and biography, in Hungarian, Magyar Elektronikus Köyutár (Hungarian Electronic Library); biography, in Hungarian, Magyar Katolikus Lexikon; Bakócz Chapel, 1506-1508, dedicated to Maria Annunciata, metropolitan and primatial cathedral of Esztergom, Fine Arts in Hungary; his effigy on a medal, Numismatic collection of Olomouc archiepiscopate, Czech Republic; his effigy on a coin, Magyar Elektronikus Köyutár (Hungarian Electronic Library); his engraving, Új Ember; and his arms, Magyarországon Képzőmüvészet; his arms and engraving, Araldica Vaticana.

(1) This is according to Eubel, Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi, II, 24, 65 and 242; and III, 304; "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936, p. 126; and his third biography in Hungarian, linked above; the first and third biographies in English, also linked above, say that he died on June 15, 1521.

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(33) 9. CORNARO, Marco (1482-1524)

Birth. 1482 (1), Venice. Of a patrician family. Third of the eleven children of Giorgio Cornaro and Elisabetta (Firenza) Morosini. The other siblings were Giovanni (brother in law of Cardinal Francesco Pisani); Giacomo; Francesco (cardinal, 1527); Cataruzza; a daughter; Girolamo; another daughter; Cornelia; another daughter; and another daughter. Nephew of Caterina Cornaro, queen of Cyprus through her marriage to James II Lusignan of Cyprus. Brother of Cardinal Francesco Cornaro, seniore (1527). Uncle of Cardinal Andrea Cornaro (1544). Uncle of Cardinals Luigi Cornaro (1551); and Federico Cornaro, seniore, O.S.Io.Hieros. (1585). Other members of the family promoted to the cardinalate were Francesco Cornaro, iuniore (1596); Federico Cornaro, iuniore (1626); Giorgio Cornaro (1697); and Giovanni Cornaro (1778). He was called Cardinal Cornaro and Cardinal Cornelius.

Education. (No information found).

Early life. Protonotary apostolic.

Sacred orders. (No information found).

Cardinalate. Created cardinal deacon in the consistory of September 28, 1500; he was published on October 2, 1500; and received the deaconry of S. Maria in Portico Octaviae on October 5, 1500. Abbot commendatario of the Benedictine monastery of S. Zenon fuori le mura, Verona, May 17, 1501 until his death. Abbot commendatario of the monastery of S. Stefano di Carrara, diocese of Padua, May 17, 1501. Arrived in Rome on September 1, 1503. Participated in the first conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Pius III. Participated in the second conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Julius II

Episcopate. Administrator of the see of Verona, November 29, 1503; he established a seminary for 36 students; occupied the post until his death. Elected bishop of Famagusta, Cyprus, December 11, 1503; resigned the see on July 1, 1504. Consecrated (no information found). Named titular Latin patriarch of Constantinople in July 1506; resigned the see, October 30, 1507; named again after June 11, 1521; occupied the see until his death. Because of the fight between Venice and the pope, he was not called to the consistory of March 22, 1509. Accompanied Pope Julius II, on January 2, 1511, to the walls of Mirandola, which was besieged and capitulated on January 20th. Named legate for the province of the Patrimony of St. Peter, January 28, 1512; the legation was renewed in 1513 and 1514. He reconciled Venice with Pope Julius II. Participated in the conclave of 1513, which elected Pope Leo X. Opted for the deaconry of S. Maria in Via Lata, March 19, 1513. Received two benefices and an indult to confer them on others, March 19, 1513. In the V Lateran Council, he was member of the Commission of Reform. Received a canonship and several benefices in the diocese of Treviso, April 23, 1513. On December 11, 1513, he received the office of the chancery of the diocese of Nicosia, Cyprus. On March 20, 1514, he received the concession of the Preceptory of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem in the Kingdom Cyprus. Named bishop of Nemosia, Cyprus, April 4, 1514; the pope recommended him to the doge of Venice the following November 4; resigned the see on March 22, 1516. On July 28, 1514, he received in commendam the church of SS. Pedro y Félix, in the town of Constanti, diocese of Tarragona. Named bishop of Padua, March 9, 1517; occupied the post until his death. Named member of a commission of cardinals for the war against the Turks on November 4, 1517. Administrator of the see of Nardò and legate of the Province of the Patrimony, January 24, 1519; occupied the first post until February 20, 1521. Archpriest of the patriarchal Vatican basilica, September 1520. Cardinal protodeacon, December 20, 1520. Participated in the conclave of 1521-1522, which elected Pope Adrian VI; announced to the Roman people the election of the new Pope Adrian VI on January 9, 1522; crowned the new pope in the patriarchal Vatican basilica on January 31, 1522. In the consistory February 21, 1523, he was one of the three cardinals named to seek the peace. Participated in the conclave of 1523, which elected Pope Clement VII. Crowned, as cardinal protodeacon, the new Pope Clement VII on November 26, 1523. Having crowned two popes, he obtained the right to opt for the first suburbicarian see that vacated. After his election, Pope Clement VII gave him as a gift the palace of S. Marco. On December 9, 1523, he was named one of the three cardinals charged with inquiring about the Lutherans. Opted for the order of cardinal priests and the title of S. Marco, December 14, 1523. Opted for the order of cardinal bishops and the suburbicarian see of Albano, May 20, 1524. Opted for the suburbicarian see of Palestrina, June 15, 1524.

Death. July 24, 1524 (2), suddenly, Venice. Buried in the church of S. Giorgio Maggiore, Venice. In 1570, together with other cardinals of his family, he was translated to the left transept of the chapel of S. Salvatore in the basilica of S. Marco, Venice.

Bibliography. Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1793, III, 291-292; Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm ab initio nascentis Ecclesiæ vsque ad Vrbanvm VIII. Pont. Max. 2 volumes. Romae : Typis Vaticanis, 1630, II, col. 1338 and 1482; "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936. Paris : Maison de la Bonne Presse, 1936, p. 126-127; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen II (1431-1503). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1914; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 24 and 67; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen III (1503-1592). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1935; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 55, 57, 65, 75, 177, 194, 256, 259, 267 and 331.

Webgraphy. Biography, in English, Italian Culture and History; Girolamo and Cardinal Marco Corner Investing Marco, Abbot of Carrara, with His Benefice c. 1520 by Tiziano Vecellio (Titian), National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., United States of America; his tomb, church of S. Nicola di Tolentino, Venice, Beni Ecclesiastici in Web (BeWeb); his prosopography, in German, Requiem Datenbank; his arms and portrait, Araldica Vaticana.

(1) This is according to his biography in English, linked above; his prosopography in German, also linked above, says that he was born in 1478; and "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936, p. 126, says that he was born in 1479.
(2) This is according to Eubel, Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi, II, 24; and III, 57; and "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936, p. 127, which adds that he did not die on July 15, 20 or 26, like other sources say; Chacón, Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm, II, 1482, says tha he died on 13 Kal Augusti [anni 1524], which is July 20, 1524.

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(34) 10. FERRERO, Gianstefano (1474-1510)

Birth. May 5, 1474, Biella. Of a family that was allied to the Acciaiouli of Florence. Fifth of the fourteen children of Sebastiano Ferraro and Tomena Avogadro. He was called the Cardinal of Bologna. His first name is also listed Giovanni Stefano; and his last name as Ferrer and as Ferreri. Brother of Cardinal Bonifacio Ferrero (1517). Uncle of Cardinal Pier Francesco Ferrero (1561). Grand-uncle of Cardinal Guido Luca Ferrero (1565). Another member of the family was Cardinal Antonio Ferrero (1505).

Education. Studied canon law in Padua and possessed a great erudition.

Early life. Auditor of the Sacred Roman Rota. Protonotary apostolic. Abbot commendatario of the Benedictine monastery of S. Stefano, Ivrea, August 19, 1489 until November 14, 1494. Abbot commendatario of S. Salvatore di Casalvolone, 1489. Abbot commendatario of the Benedictine monastery of S. Stefano, Vercelli, November 5, 1492. Abbot commendatario of Ss. Graziano e Felino di Arona, 1495 to 1508. Abbot commendatario of the monastery of S. Martino, Ivrea, until July 16, 1499.

Sacred orders. (No information found).

Episcopate. At the instance of Duchess Bianca and her son Carlo Giovanni Amadeo, duke of Savoia, he was named coadjutor with the right of succession of Vercelli on April 24, 1493. Succeeded to the see of Vercelli on July 16, 1499; occupied the see until January 21, 1502. Consecrated, January 5, 1500, Vercelli (no further information found). Occupied the see again from October 31, 1503 until November 5, 1509, when he exchanged it with his brother Bonifazio. Celebrated a synod to regulate the discipline of the clergy.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of September 28, 1500 and reserved in pectore; published in the consistory of June 28, 1502; received the red hat and the title of S. Vitale, June 28, 1502. Transferred to the see of Bologna, January 24, 1502; entered the diocese after October 1503; occupied the post until his death. Abbot commendatario of S. Maria di Staffarda, 1503. Participated in the first conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Pius III. Participated in the second conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Julius II. Opted for the title of Ss. Sergio e Bacco, deaconry elevated pro illa vice to title, December 22, 1505. Camerlengo of the Sacred College of Cardinals, January 1506 to 1507. Because his father had become general treasurer of the king of France, he exhorted the French troops, on November 2, 1506, not to lay siege to Bologna. Administrator of the see of Ivrea, November 5, 1509; exchanged the see with his brother Bonifazio; occupied the see until his death and was succeeded by his brother Bonifazio. He was the author of a work on the decision of the Sacred Roman Rota and asked Paris de Grassis, future bishop of Pesaro, to write the book De cæremoniis Cardinalium & Episcoporum in eorum Dioecesibus.

Death. October 5, 1510, Rome. Buried in the basilica of S. Clemente, Rome (1). Later, his remains were transferred to Biella and buried in the church of S. Sebastiano, of the Canons Regular Lateranese, which he had embellished. An inscription in his memory was placed by his nephew, Cardinal Pier Francesco, in 1566 on the left wall of the patriarchal Liberian basilica, Rome.

Bibliography. Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1793, III, 292-293; Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm ab initio nascentis Ecclesiæ vsque ad Vrbanvm VIII. Pont. Max. 2 volumes. Romae : Typis Vaticanis, 1630, II, col. 1339 and 1390; "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936, Paris : Maison de la Bonne Presse, 1936, p. 127; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen II (1431-1503). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1914; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 24, 65, 198 and 265; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen III (1503-1592). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1935; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 76, 84, 136, 214 and 330; Meluzzi, Luciano. I vescovi e gli arcivescovi di Bologna. Bologna : Grafica Emiliana, 1975, (Collana storico-ecclesiastica; 3), pp. 344-347.

Webgraphy. His portrait, arms and biography, Wikipedia; his portrait and arms (1890-1899), archdiocese of Bologna, Beni Ecclesiastici in Web (BeWeb); his portrait and arms, Araldica Vaticana.

(1) Text of his epitaph taken from Chacón, Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm, II, 1339:

IOANNI, STEPHANO. FERRERIO.
SANCTORVM. SERGII. ET. BACCHI. PRESB. CARDINALI. BONONIENSI.
VIRO. SANCTITATE. DOCTRINAQ. INSIGNI.
VIXIT. ANN. XXXVI. MENSES. V.
OBIIT. ANN. MDX. III. NONAS. OCTOBRIS. IVLIO. PONTIFICE. MAXIMO
.

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