The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church

Biographical Dictionary
Pope Alexander VI (1492-1503)
Consistory of March 20, 1500 (VIII)


(22) 1. HURTADO DE MENDOZA Y QUIÑONES, Diego (1444-1502)

Birth. 1444, Guadalajara, Spain. Son of Íñigo López de Mendoza, first count of Tendilla, and Elvira de Quiñones. He was destined by his parents to the church. Nephew of Cardinal Pedro González de Mendoza (1473), the Grand Cardinal of Spain, who was his lifelong protector and benefactor. Other cardinals of the family were Francisco Mendoza de Bobadilla (1544); and Íñigo López de Mendoza y Zúñiga (1530). He was called the Cardinal of Spain and the Cardinal of Sevilla.

Education. When he was still a child, he was sent to Calahorra to the house of his uncle the future cardinal, who was his tireless protector. Studied in Salamanca (no further educational information found).

Early life. While he was studying in Salamanca, he had a relationship with María de Quiñones, "la blanca", with whom he had a son, Francisco Hurtado de Mendoza, and a daughter, Juana de Mendoza; he had not yet received the sacred orders. In 1460, he accompanied his father in an embassy to the court of Pope Pius II, who was then residing in Siena; later, he went to Rome, where he stayed for several years studying the culture of the Renaissance; after he returned to Spain, he lived almost continuously in the house of his uncle, following him everywhere he went, even after having been named count of Pernia, and serving him with the utmost fidelity. Named by his uncle dean of the cathedral chapter of Sigüenza. Promoted to the episcopate at the request of his uncle.

Priesthood. Ordained (no further information found).

Episcopate. Elected bishop of Palencia (1), February 13, 1470; the old struggles concerning the lordship of the city were reignited with even more passion and the bishop was expelled from the city and many members of his household were killed; Pope Sixtus IV sent a severe monitory letter and the Spanish monarchs placed a corregidor, instead of the ordinary mayor of the city, named by the bishop; at his instance, the pope erected in the cathedral the dignity of abbot of San Salvador de Campo de Muga. Consecrated (no further information found). He participated in the principal activities of the Spanish royal family as a member of the entourage of his uncle the cardinal. He accompanied the Spanish monarchs when their son took the oath as heir of the crown in the cathedral of Toledo in May 1481. In the Winter of 1482 to 1483, a papal nuncio arrived in Spain with the bull for the crusade of reconquest of the Kingdom of Granada from the Moors; he was received the monarchs in Santo Domingo el Real de Madrid with a procession in which González de Mendoza and his inseparable nephew, Diego, took part together with other prelates. Promoted to the metropolitan see of Sevilla, August 26, 1485 (2); occupied the see until his death. On May 2, 1486, he went to Granada to receive the monarchs; remained in the court for almost two months and then returned to Sevilla. In the successive military campaigns fought by the Spanish monarchs, crowned with the occupation of Granada, the archbishop's troops joined the ones financed by his uncle the cardinal; the troops participated in the conquest of Vélez-Málaga in 1487; Málaga in also 1487; and Baeza in 1489; the following year, 1490, the archbishop and his men took part in the cutting of the trees in the fields next to the city of Granada; he not only offered his military support but also helped in the administrative functions of the conquest; he shared the triumph with the monarchs entering Granada on January 2, 1492. In 1490, he celebrated a provincial council; anticipating himself to the Council of Trent, he ordered that all parishes kept a baptismal registry. In May 1494, he was in Guadalajara helping his uncle, who was ill, arrange his affairs; he remained with the cardinal until his death occurred on January 11, 1495; he presided over the funeral and burial in Toledo; he also executed the will of the late cardinal and had a disagreement with the new archbishop of Toledo, Francisco Jiménez de Cisneros, O.F.M.Obs., over the place of burial in the major chapel, which the late cardinal had enlarged and remodeled; Archbishop Hurtado tried to obtain the see of Toledo for himself but when he learned that the monarchs had designated Jiménez de Cisneros as the new archbishop, he resented him, ignoring that Jiménez de Cisneros had recommended with great interest to the queen the appointment of the archbishop of Sevilla instead of his own. In 1496, Hernando Alonso de Herrera, humanist and professor of rhetoric and grammar, dedicated to him his work, published in Sevilla, Tres personæ: brevis quaedam disputatio de personis nominum, pronominum et participorum adversus Priscianum grammaticum. In 1497, he accompanied the king and Prince Juan to Santander to received Princess Margarita of Austria, the fiancee of the latter; he blessed their union in Burgos and then celebrated the mass of velaciones; in April 1498, he attended the Cortes of Toledo, where the princes took the oath. In 1500, he accompanied the monarchs, who went to dominate the rebellion of Alpujarras; he took Princess María to the border with Portugal, where she was going to become the new queen; there he learned that he had been elevated to the cardinalate; the Spanish monarchs asked that he be known as the Cardinal of Spain, like his uncle.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest secretly in the consistory of March 20, 1500 (3); received the red hat, October 2, 1500; and the title of S. Sabina, October 5, 1500; at the same time, he was named titular Latin patriarch of Alexandria, see that he occupied until his death. In 1501, he presided, in the name of the monarchs, the Cortes of Sevilla; he and the suffragan bishops sent several priests to Granada to instruct the rebellious Moors; several of the priests were martyred. On October 15, 1501, he finished the document of erection and endowment of all the churches, collegiate and parochial of the city and diocese of Granada, which Pope Innocent VIII had charged him with fifteen years earlier. At the beginning of 1502, he donated several jewels to the cathedral of Sevilla. Later, he went to Toledo for the taking of the oath Doña Juana and Felipe el Hermoso as prince heirs of Castilla and Aragón. On his return he stopped in Tendilla and then continued traveling to Madrid, where he died.

Death. October 14, 1502 (4), Madrid (5). His remains were transferred to Sevilla in 1504 and buried in the chapel of S. Maria la Antigua, in the metropolitan cathedral; a magnificent sepulchre of alabaster, built by Miguel Florentín (6) and commissioned by his brother Íñigo López de Mendoza, was completed in 1508 (7).

Bibliography. Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1793, III, 279; Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm ab initio nascentis Ecclesiæ vsque ad Vrbanvm VIII. Pont. Max. 2 volumes. Romae : Typis Vaticanis, 1630, II, col.1335 and 1346; "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936. Paris : Maison de la Bonne Presse, 1936, p. 121; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen II (1431-1503). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1914; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 24, 65, 165 and 210; Goñi Gaztambide, José. "Hurtado de Mendoza, Diego." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España. 4 vols and Supplement. Dirigido por Quintín Aldea Vaquero, Tomás Marín Martínez, José Vives Gatell. Madrid : Instituto Enrique Flórez, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 1972-1975; Suplemento (1987), Suppl., 388-389; Moroni, Gaetano. Dizionario di erudizione storico-ecclesiastica da S. Pietro sino ai nostri giorni. 103 vols. in 53. Venezia : Tipografia Emiliana, 1840-1861, XLIV, 201.

Webgraphy. Biographical entry, in Spanish; his portrait by an anonymous artist, archiepiscopal palace, Sevilla; his sepulchre, metropolitan cathedral of Sevilla.

(1) This is according to all the printed sources consulted; his biographical entry in Spanish, linked above, indicates that he was named bishop of Plasencia in 1481.
(2) According to Goñi, "Hurtado de Mendoza, Diego." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España, Suppl. 388, when Íñigo Manrique de Lara, archbishop of Sevilla, died at the beginning of April 1484, Cardinal Rodrigo de Borja y Borja, future pope Alexander VI, obtained for himself from Pope Innocent VIII the see of Sevilla even before exiting the conclave in which the latter had been elected. The Spanish Monarchs opposed the appointment with great energy. Pier Luigi Borgia, son of Cardinal Rodrigo, who was at the Castillian court, was incarcerated and his possessions were sequestered together with all the possessions of the Borja family; Pope Innocent VIII wrote to Cardinal González de Mendoza, to Nuncio Firmano and to the pontifical subdeacon Bartolomé Vallescar concerning this matter; also, the pope sent Bishop Giovanni Ventirulli of Cesena to Spain and sought the support of the bishops of Toledo, Compostela, Palencia and Cuenca; he cited the personal merits of Cardinal Rodrigo and his relationships; he threatened and offered rewards and everything was useless, the Spanish monarchs had their candidate and were inflexible; Cardinal Rodrigo had no choice but to resign; the candidate of the monarchs and of Cardinal González de Mendoza was the bishop of Valencia, the latter's nephew, Diego; the bull of election were issued on August 26, 1485 and the pallium of metropolitan archbishop was requested and granted in the consistory of December 9, 1485; the new archbishop took possession by procurator on March 3, 1486 and made his solemn entrance in the archdiocese on March 30, 1486.
(3) This is according to "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936, p. 121; Goñi, "Hurtado de Mendoza, Diego." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España, Suppl. 388, says that the creation took place on September 28, 1500.
(4) This is according to his epitaph transcribed in note 2, below; Goñi, "Hurtado de Mendoza, Diego." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España, Suppl. 388, says that he died on September 12, 1502; Chacón, Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm, II, col. 1346, says that he died on pridie idus Octobris ; anno 1502.
(5) Goñi, "Hurtado de Mendoza, Diego." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España, Suppl. 389, who adds that there are authors who indicate that he died in Mallorca or in Tendilla; Cardella, Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa, III279, says that he died in Madrid and adds that some sources, which he does not indentify, indicate in the island of Mallorca; Chacón, Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm, II, col. 1346, says that he died in the island of Mallorca; his biograpical entry in Spanish, linked above, says that he died in Tendilla, and was initially buried in the convent of Santa Ana, and later was transferred to Sevilla.
(6) This is according to Goñi, "Hurtado de Mendoza, Diego." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España, Suppl. 389; his biographical entry in Spanish, linked above, says that the monument was the work of Domenico Fancelli, who was a friend of the cardinal's brother.
(7) This is the text of his epitaph taken from Chacón, Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm, II, col. 1346: Reverendissimo, atque Illustrissimo DIDACO HVRTADO de Mendoza, quem clarissimum genue, insignis litearum scientia, inviolata in suo Reges fides, sanctissima æquitas in omnes, regalis munificentia in amicos, pauperes, ac ingeni animi magnitudo, temperantia celeberrimum reddiderunt, nec non religio, Pietas in Deum Opt. Maximum, Ispalensem Archepiscopum, Patriarcham Alexandrinum, Ispania Cardinalem extulerunt. Inicus Lopes de Mendoza Tendilæ Comes, germanus natu maior, Generalis Granatensis Regni Capitaneus, & illiberitanarum arcium primus præfectus, hunc fratri marmoreum tumulum fatis maiora merenti, posuit. Vixit annos LVIII. XIV Octobris MDII. Obiit.

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(23) 2. ALBRET, Amanieu d' (ca. 1478-1520)

Birth. Ca. 1478, (no place found), France. Related to the French royal family. Son of Alain, Sire d'Albret, count of Gavre, of Perigord and of Castres, and Françoise de Blois-Bretagne, countess of Perigord. Brother of King Juan III of Navarra. Nephew of Cardinal Louis d'Albret (1461). Brother-in-law of Cardinal Cesare Borgia (1493). His first name is also listed as Amadeo, Amédée, Amanevus, Amanjeu and Amaneo and his last name as Albreto, Lebrit and Lebreto. He was called the Cardinal d'Albret.

Education. (No information found).

Early life. Protonotary apostolic. Archimandrite of San Rufo, diocese of Valencia. Possibly, abbot commendatario of the Cluniacense monastery of Saint-Pierre de Lézat, diocese of Rieux, December 1490. On April 17, 1499, he was named abbot commendatario of the Premonstratensian monastery of Grâce-Dieu à la Castelle, diocese of Aire; and of the Benedictine abbey of Saint-Vincent de Lucq, diocese of Oleron. He had three illegitimate children, one son and two daughters.

Sacred orders. (No information found).

Episcopate. Administrator of the see of Cominges, July 19, 1499; on January 1, 1502, the cathedral chapter elected another candidate; at the death of bishop, Pope Leo X, on May 7, 1514, confirmed the election of Pope Alexander; he resigned without having ever taken possession. Administrator of the see of Condom, September 13 or October 15, 1499; does not seem that he ever took possession. Administrator of the see of Oleron, May 4 to October 10, 1500.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal deacon secretly in the consistory of March 20, 1500; published on September 28, 1500; the pope sent him the red hat on October 2, 1500; received the deaconry of S. Nicola in Carcere, October 5, 1500. Abbot commendatario of the Benedictine monastery of Notre-Dame de Guitres, archdiocese of Bourdeaux, March 2, 1501. He entered Rome through the "Popolo" gate on March 13, 1502; the pope received him the following day. Administrator of the see of Pamiers, March 14, 1502; resigned the post in 1506. Abbot in commendam of the Augustinian monastery of Saint-Aubert de Cambrai, April 19, 1502. Secretly sent to Savona on June 21, 1502 to bring back Cardinal Giuliano della Rovere, who had sought refuge there; returned to Rome on July 12, 1502, not having been able to fulfill his mission. Participated in the first conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Pius III. Participated in the second conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Julius II. He had to leave Rome after the election of Pope Julius II. Administrator of the see of Vannes, January 8 to October 14, 1504. Administrator perpetuo of Bazas, December 4, 1504 until his death. Administrator of the see of Lescar, October 6, 1507 until June 20, 1515. Administrator of the see of Pamplona, May 13, 1510; occupied the post until 1512; administrator of the see again, 1517; occupied the see until his death. He took part in the plot of cardinals against Pope Julius II; in the consistory of October 4, 1511, the pope threatened him with excommunication and deposition if he did not subject; he participated in the schismatic Council of Pisa; arrived in the city on October 30, 1511 and remained until its closure; he remained attached to the French party against Pope Julius II. Did not participate in the conclave of 1513, which elected Pope Leo X. He was absolved by the new Pope Leo X on April 24, 1514, together with Cardinals Guillaume Briçonnet and René de Prie; confirmed as administrator of the see of Pamiers; occupied the post, May 15 to August 18, 1514; administrator again, June 23, 1515 until his death. Administrator of the see of Conserans, June 20 to June 25, 1515. Abbot commendatario of Saint-Paul de Nérac, diocese of Lombez, 1515. Cardinal protodeacon, September 3, 1520.

Death. December 20, 1520 (1), Casteljaloux, near Bazas. Buried in Casteljaloux.

Bibliography. Berton, Charles. Dictionnaire des cardinaux, contenant des notions générales sur le cardinalat, la nomenclature complète ..., des cardinaux de tous les temps et de tous les pays ... les détails biographiques essentiels sur tous les cardinaux ... de longues études sur les cardinaux célèbre ... Paris : J.-P. Migne, 1857 ; Facsimile edition. Farnborough ; Gregg, 1969, col. 215; Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1793, III, 279-280; Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm ab initio nascentis Ecclesiæ vsque ad Vrbanvm VIII. Pont. Max. 2 volumes. Romae : Typis Vaticanis, 1630, II, col. 1334; "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936. Paris : Maison de la Bonne Presse, 1936, p. 121-122; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen II (1431-1503). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1914; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 21, 24, 56, 67, 90, 133, 135 and 207; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen III (1503-1592). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1935; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp.111, 175, 176, 177, 219, 267-268, 327 and 329; Guitarte Izquierdo, Vidal. Episcopologio Español (1500-1699). Españoles obispos en España, América, Filipinas y otros países. Rome : Instituto Español de Historia Eclesiástica, 1994. (Publicaciones del Instituto Español de Historia Eclesiástica; Subsidia; 34), p. 249; Moroni, Gaetano. Dizionario di erudizione storico-ecclesiastica da S. Pietro sino ai nostri giorni. 103 vols. in 53. Venezia : Tipografia Emiliana, 1840-1861, I, 208.

Webgraphy. Biographical entry, in Italian; biographical entry, in Spanish; his genealogy, A1 B1 C1 D1 E1; another genealogy, 3..2 [9].

(1) This is according to Eubel, Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi, II, 24 and 67; III, 268 and 327; and "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936, p. 122; Berton, Dictionnaire des cardinaux, col. 215; Moroni, Dizionario di erudizione storico-ecclesiastica da S. Pietro sino ai nostri giorni, I, 208; and the two genealogies linked above, say that he died on September 2, 1520; Chacón, Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm, II, col. 1432-1433, says that he died on 4. Idus Decemb. anno 1520.

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(24) 3. BORJA LANZOL DE ROMANÍ, O.S.Io.Hieros., Pedro Luis (1472-1511)

Birth. 1472, Valencia, Spain. Third of the eight children of Jofré de Borja Lanzol de Romaní and Juana Moncada. Grand-nephew of Pope Alexander VI, on his mother's side. Third-cousin of Cardinal Juan de Borja Lanzol de Romaní, el mayor (1492). Brother of Cardinal Juan de Borja Lanzol de Romaní, el menor (1496). Second-cousin of Cardinal Cesare Borgia (1493). His first last name is also listed as Borgia and his second last name as Llançol. Called the Cardinal de Borja.

Education. (No information found).

Early life. Knight of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem. Knight of Rhodes. In 1498, he tried to take away the priorate of the order in Cataluña, held by Fray Francisco de Boxols; Borja cited him before an auditor; when King Fernando the Catholic found out, he wrote to the Spanish ambassador in Rome and asked him to obtain from the pope the annulment of Borja's appointment and the revocation of the citation; for the moment, Borja had to content himself with the priorate of Santa Eufemia.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal deacon secretly in the consistory of March 20, 1500; published in the consistory of September 28, 1500; received the red hat, October 2, 1500; and the deaconry of S. Maria in Via Lata, October 5, 1500.

Episcopate. Elected archbishop of Valencia, July 29, 1500; succeeded his brother Cardinal Juan; occupied the see until his death; according to a notary's act, he took possession through a procurator, Guillem Ramón de Centelles, on August 29, 1500; he never visited the archdiocese. Consecrated (no information found). Governor of Spoleto, August 10, 1500. Governor of Bagnoregio. Abbot commendatario of the Cistercian monastery of Valdigna, archdiocese of Valencia; and of the Benedictine monastery of S. Simpliciano, Milan. At his instance, Pope Alexander VI granted the bull of creation of the University of Valencia on January 23, 1501; King Fernando II el Católico authorized the foundation on February 16, 1502. Entered Rome through the "Popolo" gate on June 17, 1501 and was received by his brother Rodrigo, captain of the palatine guard; the following day, accompanied by the other cardinals, he was received in consistory. In June 1501, the pope gave him the post of penitentiary major with the condition that he would receive the priestly ordination.

Priesthood. Ordained in 1502 (no further information found). Participated in the first conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Pius III. Participated in the second conclave of 1503, which elected Pope Julius II. Assumed the post of penitentiary major on December 7, 1503; occupied the post until his death. Opted for the order of cardinal priests and the title of S. Marcello, December 7, 1503; retained in commendam until his death the deaconry of S. Maria in Via Lata. Archpriest of the patriarchal Liberian basilica, Rome. After the election of Pope Julius II, which he opposed, and the detention of Cesare Borgia, and fearing the ire of the new pope, he escaped from Rome the night of December 20, 1503, together with Cardinal Francisco de Remolins; he sought refuge in Naples; on January 2, 1504, the pope wrote him a cordial letter asking him to return to Rome; the cardinal answered that he was ashamed of being free while Cesare was in jail; he remained in Naples, where in the following month of April, he received his cousin Cesare Borgia. On February 3, 1504, the Spanish monarchs wrote to their ambassador in Rome asking him to make sure that the pope did not object to the presence of Cardinals Borja and Remolins in Naples; shortly after, rumors of the death of Cardinal Borja circulated in Spain; King Fernando immediately wrote to the ambassador in Rome requesting that the pope would not name a successor to the see of Valencia until he received the nomination from the king; the rumor was unfounded and the cardinal continued his exile in Naples. Archpriest of the patriarchal Liberian basilica, Rome, shortly after May 1510. When he received the false news of the death of Pope Julius II, the cardinal speedily started for Rome.

Death. October 4 (1), 1511, of a fall from a horse while traveling from Rome to Naples. The pope learned the news of his death during the celebration of a religious ceremony in the church of S. Maria del Popolo, Rome. Buried in the church of S. Pier Celestino, Rome (2), without a funeral monument.

Bibliography. Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1793, III, 280-281; Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm ab initio nascentis Ecclesiæ vsque ad Vrbanvm VIII. Pont. Max. 2 volumes. Romae : Typis Vaticanis, 1630, II, col. 1334 and 1390; "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936. Paris : Maison de la Bonne Presse, 1936, p. 122-123; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen II (1431-1503). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1914; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 24, 56, 67 and 261 ; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi. Volumen III (1503-1592). Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1935; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, pp. 64 and 325; Goñi Gaztambide, José. "Borja Lanzol, Pedro Luis." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España. 4 vols and Supplement. Dirigido por Quintín Aldea Vaquero, Tomás Marín Martínez, José Vives Gatell. Madrid : Instituto Enrique Flórez, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 1972-1975; Suplemento (1987), I, 104; Guitarte Izquierdo, Vidal. Episcopologio Español (1500-1699). Españoles obispos en España, América, Filipinas y otros países. Rome : Instituto Español de Historia Eclesiástica, 1994. (Publicaciones del Instituto Español de Historia Eclesiástica; Subsidia; 34), p. 18; Weber, Christoph and Becker, Michael. Genealogien zur Papstgeschichte. 6 v. Stuttgart : Anton Hiersemann, 1999-2002. (Päpste und Papsttum, Bd. 29, 1-6), II, 78.

Webgraphy. Portrait and biography, in Spanish; and his genealogy.

(1) This is according to "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936. Paris : Maison de la Bonne Presse, 1936, p. 123; and his biography in Spanish, linked above; Eubel, Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi, II, 24 and 67, says that he died on October 5 or 5, 1511; the same source, III, 64 and 325, says that he died on October 5, 1511; Goñi, "Borja Lanzol, Pedro Luis." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España, I, 104, says that he died on October 5, 1511.
(2) This is according to Cardella, Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa, III, 281; and "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936, p. 123; Chacón, Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm, II, 1390; Goñi, "Borja Lanzol, Pedro Luis." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España, I, 104; and his biography in Spanish, linked above, say that he was buried in Naples.

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Note. There are discrepancies among the sources consulted concerning the date and the number of cardinals created in this consistory. "Essai de liste générale des cardinaux. VIII. Les cardinaux du XVIe siècle". Annuaire Pontifical Catholique 1936, p. 121, indicates that these three cardinals were created in the consistory celebrated on March 20, 1500. Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1793, III, 279, says that the three cardinals were promoted on March 16 or 20, 1500, and that they were published on September 28 of the same year. Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm, II, col. 1332, says that the consistory took place on Anno Domini 1500. Pontificatus 8. 13. Kal. Aprilis. Eubel, Hierarchia Catholica Medii Aevi, II, 24, indicates that the consistory took place on September 28, 1500 and that thirteen cardinals were created, the three of this consistory and the ten created in the consistory of that date, listed in the catalog of consistories of the pontificate of Pope Alexander VI on this site. Eubel adds in note 1, on that same page, that there are sources which indicate that the first three cardinals (the ones above) were created on March 16 or 20, 1500. Moreover, the sources indicate that they were promoted to the cardinalate secretly and do not mention the creations as in pectore.

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