The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church

Biographical Dictionary
Pope Clement VII (1523-1534)
Consistory of November 7, 1533 (XIV)
Celebrated in Marseille


(30) 1. LE VENEUR, JEAN (?-1543)

Birth. (No date found) (1), Normandy, France. Son of Philippe Le Veneur, baron of Tillières, Homme and Valquier, and Marie Blosset; they married in 1450. Nephew of Bishop Étienne Blosset, his predecessor in the see of Lisieux; brother of Ambroise Le Veneur, bishop of Evreux; and uncle of Gabriel Le Veneur, also bishop of Evreux. Cousin, on his mother's side, of Cardinal Jacques d'Annebaut (1544), his successor as bishop of Lisieux.

Education. (No information found).

Sacred orders. (No ordinatiom information found). Archdeacon of Lisieux. Canon of the chpater of the cathdral of Paris. Abbot commendatario of Saint-Grestain.

Episcopate. Elected bishop of Lisieux, June 27, 1505; occupied the see until August 18, 1539. Consecrated, August 24, 1505, Lisieux, in the church of the Dominicans (no further information found). Dean of Evreux, 1511-1535. Member of the Royal Council from 1516. Lieutenant general of Normandy, March 4, 1525. He received the title of count of Tillières. King François I of France named him grand almoner in 1526. He facilitated the expedition of Jacques Cartier to Canada. Abbot commendataire of Mont-Saint-Michel from 1524; and of Bec-Hellouin from 1533.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of November 7, 1533; received the red hat and the title of S. Bartolomeo all'Isola (2), November 10, 1533. Participated in the conclave of 1534, which elected Pope Paul III. He gave a better organization to the statutes of the see of Paris and reformed Collège Mignon; decidedly and firmly defended the cause of François Picart, famous doctor, exiled to Reims because of calumnies invented against him by the heretics; and obtained his triumphant return to Paris, where the people were persuaded of his innocence. He was a trusted advisor of King François I.

Death. August 7, 1543, Marle, Picardy (3). Buried church of Sanit-Andre d'Appeville.

Bibliography. Berton, Charles. Dictionnaire des cardinaux, contenant des notions générales sur le cardinalat, la nomenclature complète ..., des cardinaux de tous les temps et de tous les pays ... les détails biographiques essentiels sur tous les cardinaux ... de longues études sur les cardinaux célèbre ... Paris : J.-P. Migne, 1857 ; Facsimile edition. Farnborough ; Gregg, 1969, cols. 1605-1606; Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1793, IV, 132; Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm ab initio nascentis Ecclesiæ vsque ad Vrbanvm VIII. Pont. Max. 2 volumes. Romae : Typis Vaticanis, 1630, II, col. 1480; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recentioris Aevi. Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1935; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, III, 22, 61 and 224.

Webgraphy. Brief biographical data, in French; and his portrait, grand hall of the castle of Carrouges.

(1) His biographical data in French, linked above, says that he was born in 1505 but that was the year in which he was elected and consecrated a bishop.
(2) This is according to all the sources consulted except Berton, Dictionnaire des cardinaux, col. 1606, which says that he received the title of S. Susanna.
(3) This is according to Cardella, Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa, IV, 132; , II, col. 1480, says that he died in Rome and was buried there.

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(31) 2. LONGWY DE GIVRY, Claude de (1481-1561)

Birth. 1481, Franche-Conté, France. Third of the seven children of Philippe de Longwy, seigneur of Pagny and of Givry, and Jeanne de Bauffremont, dame de Mirebeau. The other siblings were Jean IV, Christophe, Antoine, Étienne, Charlotte and Jeanne. From infancy, he was destined to the Church. His last name is also listed as Longuy; and as Longvy. He was called Cardinal de Givry. Nephew of Étienne de Longwy, bishop of Mâcon, who resigned the see in his favor. Relative of Cardinal Anne d'Escars de Givry, O.S.B. (1596), on his mother's side.

Education. He was educated at the château of Romenay, Mâcon, residence of his uncle the bishop; later, he obtained a bachelor in decrees (canon law).

Sacred orders. Cleric of Langres. Received the diaconate. Treasurer of Saint-Martin de Tours. Canon of Saint-Vincent. He later became archdeacon of Mâcon. Bishop Étienne resigned the see of Mâcon in favor of his nephew in 1510.

Episcopate. Elected bishop of Mâcon, April 24, 1510; he took the oath of loyalty to the king of France on April 12, 1512; made his solemn entrance in the diocese on March 16, 1516. Consecrated (no information found). During the four years that passed between his election and his entrance in the diocese, he traveled several times to Paris, Milan and Rome. In his diocese, he exercise his episcopal ministry with piety and vigilance; among other things, he gave the clergy a breviary conformed to the Roman one; and reformed the abbey of Saint-Rigaud with strict measures. In 1511, he was among the twenty four French prelates who attended the Conciliabulum of Pisa, gathered at the instigation of King Louis XII in his fight against Pope Julius II; he was one of the four French bishops delegated by the king in 1514 to the Fifth Council of Letran to ask the pope for forgiveness because of the conciliabulum of Pisa the duke of Milan denied safe passage to the bishops and they wrote to the pope on March 17, 1514, declaring their adhesion to all the conciliar decisions. Abbot commendatario of the abbey of Sainte-Croix, Potiers, in 1517. On July 8, 1522, he signed in Saint-Jean-de-Losne the conclusive treaties between the king of France and Philibert de Luxembourg, in the name of the emperor, concerning the neutrality of Bourgogne and the Mâconnais. In 1522, he went to Paris with François de Rohan, archbishop of Lyon, and the principal prelates of the realm to attend the grand assembly of the clergy, presided by King François I. In 1525, he was momentarily administrator of the see of Autun. On May 25, 1526, he attended the États du Mâconnais as chief and president, exercising an unlimited power as such. On June 8, 1526, he attended the États d'Auxonne, where he defended the obedience to the king of France like he did several other similar meetings. In January 1527, he received directives from Pope Clement VII to activate the measures of defense against Lutheranism. On December 16, 1527, he attended the Royal Council celebrated in Paris concerning the Mâconnais. On March 20 to 24, 1528, he presided over the provincial council of Lyon (dioceses of Mâcon, Autun, Langres and Chalon) because of the illness of the metropolitan archbishop, François de Rohan; the substitution was approved by the king. In October 1528, he represented the clergy in the États de Bourgogne, which met at the abbey of Saint-Étienne in Dijon. Elected unanimously bishop of Langres by its cathedral chapter, following the indication of King François I, on Wednesday October 13, 1529; informed of the election, he asked for a few days to consult with his friends, after which, he accepted the election was confirmed by the metropolitan archbishop of Lyon, primate of the Gauls. Resigned the government of the see of Mâcon on November 10, 1529. On January 23, 1530, in Dijon, he took the oath of loyalty to the king of France, before the monarch. As bishop of Langres, he became duke Langres and pair of France. Elected abbot commendatario of Saint-Étienne de Dijon by its canons, he was confirmed by Pope Clement VII on February 13, 1530; he was the 45th abbot; he was represented by André de Leval, dean of the Sainte Chapel in his reception and oath, which took place on October 21, 1530. He made his solemn entrance in the diocese on September 26, 1530. On October 2, 1530, he celebrated in the church of Saint-Désire, Lons-le-Saunier, the solemn funeral of his cousin Philibert de Chalon, the last prince of Orange from the house of Chalon, killed at the service of Emperor Charles V, during the final stages of the siege of Florence. Abbot commendatario of the Augustinian monastery of Saint-Étienne Aedunensis, diocese of Rieux. He was in England from September 5 to 11, 1532, sent by King François I of France in a discreet (if not secret) mission concerning the negotiations of King Henry VIII to have his marriage to Queen Catalina of England annulled and his weeding to Ann Boleyn accepted by Rome.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of November 7, 1533; received the red hat and the title of S. Agnese in Agone, November 10, 1533. After his promotion to the cardinalate, he added to his name the appellative "de Givry", which was a fiefdom of his family. Named administrator perpétuel of the see of Poitiers at the request of the king of France on April 29, 1534; in 1544, he published Constitutions synodales (chez Bouchet, Poitiers); resigned the administration on January 30, 1551. Abbot commendatario of Saint-Séverin d'Aire, ca. June 1534 until ca. 1546. Abbot commendatario of Saint-Pierre-de-Bèze until 1546. Did not participate in the conclave of 1534, which elected Pope Paul III. Between April 15 and May 12, 1537, he celebrated five diocesan synods, which he convoked separately by deanship because of the distances in the diocese of Langres; in 1538, he published and distributed to the clergy through the rural deans Statuts synodaux. Abbot commendatario of Saint-Pierre-sur-Dive, diocese of Séez (now diocese of Bayeux) from December 22, 1539 until 1549. On January 1, 1540, he was present at the arrival of Emperor Charles V in Paris. Named administrator perpétuel of the see of Périgueux, August 27, 1540; resigned the administration, August 27, 1541. Abbot commendatario of the Benedictine abbey of Saint-Bénigne de Dijon in 1541. First abbot commendatario of the abbey of Braisne, diocese of Soissons in 1541. Grand prior of Saint-Léger, for less than two years, until 1545. In February 1546, he consecrated Charles de Lorraine, archbishop of Reims, future cardinal, in the chapel of the castle of Joinville. Named administrator of the see of Amiens on September 24, 1540 (1); resigned the administration before February 12, 1546. In 1547, he traveled to Italy charged with missions that had been waiting for a long time; due to the death of King François I of France on March 31, 1547, he had to return to France; attended the funeral of the king the following April in Saint-Denis. Cardinal Givry attended the coronation of the new King Henri II on July 25, 1547. He returned to Italy in December 1547 to deal with urgent affairs of the king; he returned to France before the summer of 1550. Cardinal Givry received from the pope on April 16, 1548 the faculty to make a will. Did not participate in the conclave of 1549-1550, which elected Pope Julius III (2). On July 1, 1550, he attended the funeral of Claude de Lorraine, duke of Guise, father of Cardinal Charles de Lorraine, in the church of Saint-Laurent, in Joinville. Participated in the first conclave of 1555, which elected Pope Marcellus II. Participated in the second conclave of 1555, which elected Pope Paul IV. Did not participate in the conclave of 1559, which elected Pope Pius IV. Had an elegant version of the Breviary published in 1560. He donated to the cathedral of Langres eight splendid tapestries, depicting the legend of Saint Mammès, two of which are in the transept, and the third is deposited in the Musée du Louvre in Paris. Cardinal Givry conducted canonical visitations to his dioceses in person and through the archdeacons; his main concerns were the holy life of the priests; the discipline of the religious; the defense of the orthodox doctrine before current heresies, especially Lutheranism; and the sacramental and liturgical practices of the diocese (he published the Breviary langrois in 1536 and 1560; the Missal langoris in 1536 and 1549; and the Ritual langrois in 1538). He traveled extensively from 1529 until his death (3). Cardinal Givry was Homme du Roi in his diocese, because of his closeness, collaboration, obedience and friendship with the monarchs of his time.

Death. Saturday August 9, 1561, at 3 a.m., after receiving the sacraments of the Church, at château of Mussy-sur-Seine. His body was embalmed and his entrails were buried before the main altar of the church of Mussy. On the following August 23, his body was taken to Langres, without grand ceremonies; the solemn exequies were celebrated by the canons of the cathedral chapter in the presence of his relatives, friends and a large number of people from the city; he was buried in the site that he had chosen in the cathedral of Saint-Mammès, Langres (4). In Dijon, where the news of his death was received on August 11, the monks of the abbey of Saint-Étienne celebrated a funeral service (5). He named executors of his will Jedan de Martigny, chevalier, and Jehan Joubert, archdeacon of Rouen (6). Until the French Revolution, the mausoleum of the cardinal was situated in front of the entrance to the sacristy of the cathedral of Langres, not far from the main altar, to the right, and near the episcopal throne. It had a statue of bronze, genuflecting and in prayer. Hanging from the ceiling of the arcade was his red hat.

Bibliography. Berton, Charles. Dictionnaire des cardinaux, contenant des notions générales sur le cardinalat, la nomenclature complète ..., des cardinaux de tous les temps et de tous les pays ... les détails biographiques essentiels sur tous les cardinaux ... de longues études sur les cardinaux célèbre ... Paris : J.-P. Migne, 1857 ; Facsimile edition. Farnborough ; Gregg, 1969, col. 1144; Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1793, IV, 132-134; Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm ab initio nascentis Ecclesiæ vsque ad Vrbanvm VIII. Pont. Max. 2 volumes. Romae : Typis Vaticanis, 1677, II, col. 1480; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recentioris Aevi. Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1935; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, III, 22, 31, 59, 106, 226, 238, 272 and 274; Marcel, Louis-Alexis-Emmanuel. Le cardinal de Givry, évêque de Langres (1529-1561). 2 v. Dijon : Impr. de M. Darantière,1926. Contents: v. 1. La Réforme; v. 2. La Renaissance.

Webgraphy. His engraving and biography, in French, Wikipedia; his genealogy, in French, GeneWeb.

(1) This is according to Eubel, Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recentioris Aevi, III, 106. Marcel, Le cardinal de Givry, évêque de Langres (1529-1561), p. 46-47, says that he was bishop of Amiens.
(2) This is according to Eubel, Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recentioris Aevi, III, 31, which lists him among the cardinals who were absent. Marcel, Le cardinal de Givry, évêque de Langres (1529-1561), p. 40, says that in a letter written on January 20, 1550 to King Henry II, Cardinal Charles I de Guise de Lorraine said the there were no news about Cardinals de Givry or Annebout; the letter was passed through a hole in the wall of the room of Cardinal Jean du Bellay, informing the king about what was happening in the "prison" of the conclave. But then, on the following February 18, Florentine ambassador Averardo Serristori, wrote a letter to the grand duke commenting on the death in conclave of a cardinal, said that Cardinal de Givry was ill and very old may follow the same fate, therefore, he was present in the conclave. Marcell says that he may have been one of the two cardinals who had embarked at La Spezia with Cardinal de Lorraine to go to Rome, according to a Florentine agent; and concludes that perhaps Cardinal de Givry was not present at the moment of the election of Pope Julius III, but that he attended the conclave even if he did not have an active role.
(3) This was his itinerary during those years, taken from Marcel, Le cardinal de Givry, évêque de Langres (1529-1561), p. 446-448: November 4, 1529 - Paris; December 13, 1529 - Couchey-lez-Dijon; January 23, 1530 - Dijon; September 26, 1530 - Langres; October 2, 1530 - Lons-le-Saunier, for the funeral of his cousin Philibert de Chalon; October 25, 1530 - Lons-le-Saunier; August 24, 1531 - Selongey; September 5-6, 1532 - London; October 21, 1532 - Boulogne; June 3, 1533 - Langres; Octobre-Novembee 1533 - Marseille; January 1534 - Langres; January 21, 1534 - Langres; April 1, 15, 26, 27 and May 6, 1534 - Langres; August 2, 1534 - Dijon; October 13, 1534 - Rome, at the conclave which elected Pope Paul III; November 4, 1534 - Dikon; March 23, 1535 - Mussy; October 1535 - Jijon; January 25-26, 1536 - Langres; April 5, 16, 1537 - Langres; April 20, 21, 1537 - Mussy; May 2, 1537 - Selongey; February 10, 1538 - Moulins; August 8, 1538 - Dijon; January 1, 1540 - Paris, at the arrival of Emperor Charles V; September 30, 1540 - Paris; October 30, 1540 - Paris; March 19, 1541 - Mussy; March 31, 1541 - Mussy; Macrh 26, 1542 - Poitiers; August 16, 1542 - Mussy; March 25, 1543 - Poitiers; July 14, 15, 1543 - Paris; January 29, 1544 - Paris; March 16, 1544 - Mussy; March 22, 1544 - Jouarre; January 30, 1545 - Langres; October 8, 1545 - Mussy; February 1546 - Joinville, to consecrated Charles de Lorraine, archbishop of Reims, future cardinal; April 8, 1546 - Langres; February-March 1547 - Italy; April 1547 - Saint-Denis, at the funeral of King François I of France; ... 1547 - Langres; December 9, 18, 26, 1547 - Rome; ... 1548 - Rome; July 1547 - Reims; May 10, 11, 1549 - Dijon; September 21, 1549 - Mussy; January-February 1550 - Rome; April 14, 28, 1550? - Frigonais, Pietra santa, en Tuscany; July 1, 1550 - Joinville, to the funeral of Claude de Lorraine; October 30, 1550 - Gurgy; February 14, 1551 - Mussy; October 4, 1551 - Mussy; March 14, 1553 - Dijon; March 22, 1553 - Langres; August 1, 1553 - Mussy; March 1554 - Dijon; August 2, 1554 - Mussy; October 20, 1554 - Mussy; May 15, 1555 - Mussy; September 2, 1555 - Pagny; October 10, 1555 - Mussy; March 9, 1556 - Gurgy; November 26, 1556 - Mussy; December 22, 1556 - Mussy;. February 26, 1557 - Gurgy; March 7, 1559 - Mussy; August 4, 1559 - Mussy; October 18, 1559 - Reims, to the consecration of King François II of France; December 31, 1559 - Gurgy; January 29, 1560 - Langres; August 9, 1560 - Mussy; September 15, 1560 - Mussy; December 15, 1560 - Gurgy; May 15, 1561 - Mussy; Agust 9, 1561 - died in Mussy.
(4) This is the text of the inscription in the black marble tombstone, taken from Marcel, Le cardinal de Givry, évêque de Langres (1529-1561), p. 444:

HIC JACET CLAVDIVS DE LONGOVICO.
DICTVS GIVRIACO.
S. R. E. CARDINALIS TITVLI S AGNETIS IN AGONE.
EPISCOPVS DVX LINGONENSIS.
PAR FRANCIÆ.
QVI OBIIT APVD MVXEIVM IXº AVGVSTI.
ANNO MDLI.
ANNOS NATVS LXXX, PONTIFICATVS SVI XXXII.
DE ECCLESIA MVNIFICENTISSIME MERITVS.
ANIMA EJVS REQVIESCAT IN PACE.
AMEN.

(5) This the cardinal's funeral eulogy, taken from Marcel, Le cardinal de Givry, évêque de Langres (1529-1561), p. 499: Claudius de Longvy, cardinalis vulgo de Givry nuncupatus, episcopus, dux Lingonensis, post octoginta felicissime expletos annos, cum plures adhuc propter exquisitam victus rationem et insitam ab adolescentia continentiam polliceretur, dissectæ religionis misertus, et vitæ longioris quasi pertesus, quinto idus augusti anno Domini millesimo quingentesimo sexagesimo primo, episcopatus sui tricesimo secundo, apud Mussiacum, magno sui relicto desiderio, pie, et religiose moritur : et eadem ipsius anniversarium celebratur, pro cujus dotatione bis mille aureos solidos testamento legavit. Is cum hujus insignis ecclesiæ gubernacula suscepisset, quietis et pacis studiosissimus lites plurimas, et dissedia sui preedecessoris temporibus in capitulum commota, summa æquitate et prudentia sedavit : atque his præclaris initiis dignitatem auspicatus, ad instauranda et ornanda Mussiaci, Lusiaci et Gurgei castella animum convertit. His interim, quæ ad pietatem et religionem pertinebant, minime neglectis, templum etiam hoc singulari illo suggesto et septis ex secto lapide, miro artificio illustravit : necnon peristromata seu tapeta historiae D. Mammetis suis insignibus conspersa, cum preciosis cappis auro et argento intextis, ad cultus divini opus et ornamentum donavit. Post hocc sibi vivens sepulchrum paravit, quo vir pacificus, liberalis, religiosus, ac omnium undequaque continentissimus quiescit. Post cujus obitum sedes episcopalis annum et plus eo vacavit. . Marcel indicates that the original document is in Bibliothèque Nationale, Collection Bourgogne, t. 8, folio 451 (cartulaire de l'Évêché de Langres).
(6) According to Marcel, Le cardinal de Givry, évêque de Langres (1529-1561), p. 439-440, in one of his will prepared on August 1, 1553, the cardinal began the document with the following paragraphs, which the author says trasnpire a sincere piety and a right and delicate conscience:
Monseigneur le révérendissime cardinal de Givry, évesque et duc de Langres, per de France, recongneut que comme nous soyons tous subjectz à la mort et exposez à une infinité de maladies avec autres accidens tant extrêmes etviollens que à grand peine peult l'homme aucunes foys avoir le loysir et commodité de disposer de ses biens temporelz et penser aussy peu de l'estat de sa conscience : à ces causes, voulant et désirant singulièrement pour son debvoir et repos pendant que, grâce à Dieu, il se treuve en bonne sancté et que l'esperit est entier, pourveoir et donner ordre à la sureté de sa maison et tranquilité de ses héritiers et successeurs, a faict et éxpedié son testament et ordonnance de dernière volonté, ainsi et par la forme et manière qui s'ensuyt :
Premièrement a mon dict seigneur révérendissime remercié très humblement son Dieu créateur et saulveur de tous les biens, dons de grâce, honneurs, dignités et estas qu'il luy a pleu luy conférer et deppartir en ce monde, luy recommandant son âme pecheresse, pour laquelle il supplie et implore sa divine bonté et inconprenable miséricorde, déclarant en oultre et protestant en son sainct nom qu'il a tousjours tenu, tient et veult tenir à la saincte foy catholicque en laquelle nostre mère l'Église l'a instruict et appris, et entend y vivre et moryr moyenant sa saincte grâce.

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(32) 3. COLIGNY DE CHÂTILLON, Odet de (1517-1571)

Birth. July 10, 1517, castle of Châtillon-sur-Loing, France. Of an illustrious family. Second son of Gaspard de Coligny, maréchal de France and Louise de Montmorency. Brother of Admiral Gaspard de Coligny. Nephew of Anne de Montmorency. He is known as Cardinal de Châtillon.

Education. Il fut élevé avec beaucoup de soin, il se fit remarquer par son esprit et son goût pour les belles-lettres (1); (no further educational information found).

Early life. He was 16 years old and a layman when promoted to the cardinalate.

Sacred orders. (No information found).

Cardinalate. Created cardinal deacon in the consistory of November 7, 1533; received the red hat and the deaconry of Ss. Sergio e Bacco, November 10, 1533. Participated in the conclave of 1534, which elected Pope Paul III. Abbot commendatario of Saint Bénigne de Dijon, of Fleury, of Ferrière and of Vaux de Cernay.

Episcopate. Administrator of the metropolitan see of Toulouse, April, 29, 1534; at that time he had not received the priestly ordination; resigned the administration, October 20, 1550. Consecrated (no information found). Administrator of the see of Beauvais (2), October 20, 1535; occupied the administration until he was deprived of his episcopal benefices on March 31, 1563. Abbot commendatario of Saint-Lucien de Beauvais from 1537. Opted for the deaconry of S. Adriano, February 25, 1549. Participated in the conclave of 1549-1550, which elected Pope Julius III. He was placed in charge of the library of the Royal Privy Council; he protected Ronsard, and then Rabelais, for whom he obtained, in 1550, a privilege of ten years to print books and who dedicated to him his Quart Livre. Participated in the first conclave of 1555, which elected Pope Marcellus II. Participated in the second conclave of 1555, which elected Pope Paul IV. Abbot commendatario of Ferrières from 1556. Did not participate in the conclave of 1559, which elected Pope Pius IV. In 1560, Pope Pius IV named him grand inquisitor of France; the opposition to the inquisition by the Parlement of Paris impeded him from occupying the position. Abbot commendatario of Grandchamps. Abbot commendatario of Quincy and of Vézelay from 1560. Influenced by his parents and his brothers, he publicly became a Calvinist in April 1561 and greatly helped those of the Huguenot party; he participated with his brother in the religious wars and was a mediator between the Protestants and Queen Catarina de' Medici. In 1562 the Inquisition declared him a heretic. He escaped to Lyon, relinquished his title of cardinal and called himself the count of Beauvais. In the secret consistory of March 31, 1563, Pope Pius IV declared him heretic for having become a Calvinist and deprived him of all his episcopal and cardinalitial benefices. In December 1564, he married Isabeau de Hauteville (3) wearing, at the request of the Huguenots, his cardinal's robes. His position as a leader of the Protestants forced him to leave for England in 1568, to flee persecution from Queen Caterina de' Medici. In London, Queen Elizabeth I favored him and his wife, who was called Mme. la Cardinale. He was preparing to go to La Rochelle to join his brother when he was poisoned.

Death. April 13, 1571 (4), Master Homor's, the guest-house for pilgrims, Canterbury (5), poisoned by his valet de chambre; it was rumored that at the instigation of Queen Caterina de' Medici. Buried in Trinity Chapel, Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, England. His widow claimed her dowry in 1602 but the Parlement of Paris denied her petition.

Bibliography. Atkinson, Ernest G. The Cardinal of Châtillon in England, 1568-1571 : a paper read on November 13, 1889, before the Huguenot society of London. London : printed by Spottiswoode & co., 1890; Becquerel, Antoine César. Souvenirs historiques sur l'amiral Coligny : sa famille et sa seigneurie de Châtillon-Sur-Loing. 2d ed. Paris : Firmin-Didot, 1876; Berton, Charles. Dictionnaire des cardinaux, contenant des notions générales sur le cardinalat, la nomenclature complète ..., des cardinaux de tous les temps et de tous les pays ... les détails biographiques essentiels sur tous les cardinaux ... de longues études sur les cardinaux célèbre ... Paris : J.-P. Migne, 1857 ; Facsimile edition. Farnborough ; Gregg, 1969, cols 692-693; Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1793, IV, 134-135; Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm ab initio nascentis Ecclesiæ vsque ad Vrbanvm VIII. Pont. Max. 2 volumes. Romae : Typis Vaticanis, 1630, II, cols. 1480-1481; Coligny, Odet de, cardinal de Chbtillon, 1515-1571. Correspondance d'Odet de Coligny, cardinal de Chatillon (1537-1568). Recueillie et publiée par M. Léon Marlet. Paris, A. Picard, 1885. (Documents publ. par la Sociité historique & archéologique du Gatinais; I); Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recentioris Aevi. Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1935; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, III, 22, 72, 76, 131 and 315; Marlet, Léon. Le Cardinal de Châtillon : 1517-1571. Paris : H. Menu, 1883.

Webgraphy. Biography, in English; brief biography, in French; his portrait, ca.1535, École française, châteaux de Versailles et de Trianon, Versailles, France; his portrait, ca. 1550, atelier of François Clouet, musée Condé, Chantilly, France; portrait of Isabeau de Hauteville by François Clouet, musée Condé, Chantilly, France; his portrait, attributed to François Clouet, musée Condé, Chantilly, France; his drawing, atelier of François Clouet, musée Condé, Chantilly, France; another version of the same drawing, atelier of François Clouet, musée Condé, Chantilly, France; stained-glass window of his presentation to the Risen Christ by Saint-Odet, church of Saint-Acceul, Ecouen, France; medallion with his bust by Adolphe Disiré Crauk, called Gustave, Musée des Beaux-Arts, Valenciennes, France; Les trois Coligny, Odet, cardinal, à gauche, Gaspard au milieu, François à droite by an anonymous artist, musée Condé, Chantilly, France; his engraving; and another engraving, Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nürnberg, Germany; his painting as Neptune and biographical data, in French, at the middle of the page; his tomb, Trinity Chapel, Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, England.

(1) Berton, Dictionnaire des cardinaux, col. 692: "He was educated with great care and was remarkable for his spirit and his liking of the humanities".
(2) This is according to Eubel, Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recentioris Aevi, III, 22 and 131; and Cardella, Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa, IV, 134; his biography in English, linked above, says that he was named bishop and count of Cambrai; neither Eubel nor Pius Bonifatius Gams, Series episcoporum Ecclesiae catholicae. 3 v. in 1. Graz : Akademische Druck- u. Verlagsanstalt, 1957), listed him among the occupants of that see.
(3) She is also listed as Elizabeth de Kanteville.
(4) This is according to Eubel, Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recentioris Aevi, III, 22; Berton, Dictionnaire des cardinaux, col. 693, says that he died on February 14, 1571; and his biography in English, linked above, says that he died on March 22, 1571.
(5) This is according to William Danks and E. W. Haslehust, E. W. Canterbury. (London : Blackie, 1910); and his biography in English, linked above; his brief biography in French; and the page of the medallion with his bust, both linked above, indicate that he died in Hampton Court, London.

Cool Archive

(33) 4. LA CHAMBRE, O.S.B., Philippe de (ca.1490-1550)

Birth. Ca.1490, Savoy. Fourth son of Louis de Seyssel, count of La Chambre, and Anne de La Tour d'Auvergne; she was the widow of Alexander Stuart, duke of Albany; and is also listed as Anne de Boulogne. He was known as Cardinal de Boulogne. He was related to Queen Caterina de' Medici of France.

Education. Entered the Order of Saint Benedict (Benedictine) at a very young age (1).

Sacred orders. Ordained (no information found). Elected by the pope abbot in commendam of the Benedictine abbey of Saint-Pierre-de-Corbie, 1523; a legal battle followed because the king of France had named Cardinal Louis de Bourbon to the same abbey; he could not take possession until a sentence of the parliament in October 1528 recognized his rightful appointment by the pope; as soon as he was invested as abbot, he left Corbie for Paris and never returned, except to collect the rents and to pay the allowances due to the Cardinal of Bourbon.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of November 7, 1533; received the red hat and the title of S. Martino ai Monti, November 10, 1533. Participated in the conclave of 1534, which elected Pope Paul III.

Episcopate. Administrator of the see of Belley (2), January 8, 1535 until May 24, 1538. Opted for the title of S. Prassede, March 23, 1541. Opted for the title of S. Maria in Trastevere, February 15, 1542. Opted for the order of cardinal bishops and the suburbicarian see of Frascati, September 24, 1543. Administrator of the see of Quimper, July 19, 1546 until his death. Participated in the conclave of 1549-1550, which elected Pope Julius III.

Death. February 21, 1550, Rome. Buried in the church of SS. Trinità al Monte Pincio, Rome.

Bibliography. Berton, Charles. Dictionnaire des cardinaux, contenant des notions générales sur le cardinalat, la nomenclature complète ..., des cardinaux de tous les temps et de tous les pays ... les détails biographiques essentiels sur tous les cardinaux ... de longues études sur les cardinaux célèbre ... Paris : J.-P. Migne, 1857 ; Facsimile edition. Farnborough ; Gregg, 1969, cols. 650-651 ; Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1793, IV, 136; Chacón, Alfonso. Vitæ, et res gestæ Pontificvm Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalivm ab initio nascentis Ecclesiæ vsque ad Vrbanvm VIII. Pont. Max. 2 volumes. Romae : Typis Vaticanis, 1630, II, col. 1480; Eubel, Conradus and Gulik, Guglielmus van. Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recentioris Aevi. Münich : Sumptibus et Typis Librariae Regensbergianae, 1935; reprint, Padua : Il Messagero di S. Antonio, 1960, III, 22, and 130-131.

Webgraphy. Biography, in Italian; his genealogy, suite, no. 2; another genealogy.

(1) This is according to Berton, Dictionnaire des cardinaux, col. 650; Cardella, Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa, IV, 136; and his biography in Italian, linked above; Eubel, Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recentioris Aevi, III, 22, 130-131, does not mention that he was a Benedictine. He certainly behaved like a commendatario and not like a Benedictine abbot after the parliament recognized his appointment.
(2) Cardella, Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa, IV, 136; and his biography in Italian, linked above, say that he was named bishop of Boulogne, also known as Terovanne or Terouane; and the site of the Abbey of Saint-Pierre-de-Corbie, linked above, says that he was bishop of Tournai; neither Eubel nor Pius Bonifatius Gams (Series episcoporum Ecclesiae catholicae. 3 v. in 1. Graz : Akademische Druck- u. Verlagsanstalt, 1957) list him among the occupants of those sees.

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