The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church

Biographical Dictionary
Pope Benedict XIII (1724-1730)
Consistory of November 26, 1727 (VII)
Celebrated in Rome


(18) 1. ASTORGA Y CÉSPEDES, Diego de (1664-1734)

Birth. October 10, 1664, Gibraltar, diocese of Cádiz, Spain (1). Of a modest family.His second last name is also listed as Cespides.

Education. Studied at the University of Granada, where he obtained a licentiate in canon law.

Priesthood. Ordained, December 17, 1689. Synodal examiner and vicar general of Cádiz, 1694. Vicar general of Ceuta, 1705. Inquisitor of the city and kingdom of Murcia, 1710.

Episcopate. Elected bishop of Barcelona, March 30, 1716. Consecrated, June 14, 1716, church of San Patricio, Lorca, diocese of Cartagena, by Luis Antonio Belluga y Moncada, Orat., bishop of Cartagena, assisted by Jerónimo del Valle Ledesma, bishop of Almería, and by Diego Muñoz Baquerizo, bishop of Segorbe. He promoted the devotion to Our Lady of Europe. Inquisitor general of Spain, March 30, 1720. Promoted to the metropolitan and primatial see of Toledo, July 22, 1720.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of November 26, 1727; with the apostolic brief of December 6, 1727, the pope sent him the red biretta; he never went to Rome to receive the red hat and the title. Did not participate in the conclave of 1730, which elected Pope Clement XII.

Death. February 9, 1734, Madrid. Exposed in the metropolitan cathedral of Toledo, and buried in front of the altar El Transparente, which he had built, in the chapel of the Santísimo Sacramento in that cathedral.

Bibliography. Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. 9 vols. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1794, VIII, 29-231; Gonzálvez, Ramón. "Astorga y Céspedes, Diego de." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España. 4 vols and Supplement. Dirigido por Quintín Aldea Vaquero, Tomás Marín Martínez, José Vives Gatell. Madrid : Instituto Enrique Flórez, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 1972-1975; Suplemento (1987), I, 151; Guitarte Izquierdo, Vidal. Episcopologio Español (1700-1867). Españoles obispos en españa, América, Filipinas y otros países. Rome : Instituto Español de Historia Eclesiástica, 1994. (Publicaciones del Instituto Español de Historia Eclesiástica; Subsidia; 29), p. 30, no. 106; Notizie per l'anno 1732. Rome : Nella Stamperia del Chracas, presso S. Marco al Corso, 1732, p. 80; Notizie per l'anno 1736. Rome : Nella Stamperia del Chracas, presso S. Marco al Corso, 1736, p. 202, no. 14; Ritzler, Remigium, and Pirminum Sefrin. Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recientoris Aevi. Volumen V (1667-1730). Patavii : Typis et Sumptibus Domus Editorialis "Il Messaggero di S. Antonio" apud Basilicam S. Antonii, 1952, pp. 37, 114 and 383.

Links. Biography, in English, Wikipedia; Los informes de visita ad limina de los arzobispos de Toledo by Ángel Fernández Collado (2002), in Spanish; his portrait by Alonso Miguel de Tovar, esacademic; his portrait by Alonso Miguel de Tovar, Biblioteca Digital Hispánica, Biblioteca Nacional de España; his engraving by Juan Bernabé Palomino, Biblioteca Digital Hispánica, Biblioteca Nacional de España; his engraving by an unknown artist, Biblioteca Digital Hispánica, Biblioteca Nacional de España; and his engraving, Excmo. Ayuntamiento de Toledo.

(1) This is according to Notizie per l'anno 1736, p. 202, no. 14. Notizie per l'anno 1732, p. 80, says that he was born in 1666. Gonzálvez, "Astorga y Céspedes, Diego de." Diccionario de historia eclesiástica de España, I, 151, says that he was born in 1665. Guitarte Izquierdo, Episcopologio Español (1700-1867), p. 30, no. 106, says that he was born in 1664. Suite de la Clef, ou Journal historique sur les matières du tems : contenant aussi quelques nouvelles de litterature, & autres remarques curieuses. Par le sieur C. J. [Claude Jordan]. 1717-1776, 1734/01 (T35), 1734/06, p. 315, says that he was born on October 17, 1666. Ritzler, Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recientoris Aevi, V, 37; 114, says that he was 69 years and almost four months at the time of his death; and older than 50 years in 1716, when he was elected bishop of Barcelona. Diario Romano, March 13, 1734, says that he died when he was anni 69, mesi 3 e giorni 19 of age, which would have been be October 20, 1664.

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(19) 2. KOLLONITSCH, Sigismund von (1677-1751)

Birth. May 28, 1677, Nagy Levar (Gross-Schützen) (Velke Levare), archdiocese of Esztergom, Hungary (now Slovakia) (1). Of a family of Croatian origin. Youngest of the seven children five boys and two girls, of Count Johann Sigismund von Kollonitsch and Regina Elisabeth von Speidl. One of his brothers was Ignaz Leopold; and one of his two sisters, Anna Maria Eleonora, was a Carmelite nun in Vienna. Nephew of Cardinal Leopold Karl von Kollonitsch (1686). His last name is also listed as Kollonitz, or Kollonich, or Colonicz.

Education. On the initiative of his uncle the archbishop, from 1688, he studied at the Jesuit Gymnasium in Neuhaus, Bohemia, where he met Francis II Rákóczi, prince of Transylvania; later, also on the recommendation of his uncle, he studied in Rome, from 1693 to 1699, at Collegio Germanico, where he obtained doctorates in philosophy and theology; and at the Pontifical Roman Athenaeum of S. Apollinare. While he was in Rome, his uncle gave him a canonicate in the metropolitan cathedral chapter of Esztergom.

Priesthood. Ordained, October 22, 1699. He celebrated his first mass on October 15, 1699, in the Carmelite Church in Vienna, in the presence of Emperor Leopold I and his wife, Empress Eleanor (2). He took possession of his canonicate in Esztergom in 1700. In 1704, he became archdeacon of Sasvár. Royal counselor of the king of Hungary, 1705. In December 1708, Emperor Joseph I nominated him bishop of Vác, Hungary.

Episcopate. Elected bishop of Vác, October 14, 1709 (3). Consecrated, December 7, 1709 (no further information found). In Vác, he had to rebuild the diocese recently freed from the Turks and work for the conversion of many non-Catholics; by setting up boarding houses, he took care of the young priests; in 1712, he founded a Piarist school; and he also increased the number of cathedral canons and enhanced their income. Nominated to the see of Vienna by Emperor Karl VI on April 16, 1716. Transferred to that see on July 1, 1716. In December 1716, he issued a detailed order for the clergy; in it, among other things, he urged the clergy to wear priestly clothes, live a holy life, and celebrate the mass solemnly and respectfully; he ordered that every priest should, at least once a year, participate in spiritual exercises. In 1717, he order the examination of foreign priests and established that their permission for the celebration of the mass should be granted only for a month; and that after three extensions, they had to demonstrate that they had participated in spiritual exercise. In addition, the priests were obliged to weekly confession and for the first time, catalogs of diocesan priests were created. Furthermore, all priests who were exercising any office in the ministry had to participate in weekly spiritual meetings. A rigorous examination of the candidates for ordination was also established. To secure the increase of the number of young priests, he augmented the places of the alumni foundation from six to twelve. He founded a theological seminary; and introduced retreats for the laity in 1719. He was a member of the Imperial Privy Council from 1719 to 1723; and 1728 to 1732. Promoted to archbishop when the diocese of Vienna was elevated to metropolitan see, June 1, 1722. He was granted the pallium on January 20, 1723. He showed his special care for the poor when, in 1726, he was instrumental in the founding of St. Johannes Nepomuk hospital, which played a major role in Vienna.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of November 26, 1727; with an apostolic brief of December 23, 1727, the pope sent him the red biretta; the emperor imposed the biretta on the new cardinal on April 4, 1728, in the church of the Augustinians. To cover the expenses associated with the cardinalate, the emperor gave him in 1728 the abbey of St. Michael in Báta, diocese of Pécs, Hungary; and also the provostship of Zwettl and the associated sovereign parish of Eggenburg. Named inquisitor general for Spain and Sicily, November 27, 1728 (4); in this position he had the assistance of Father Georg Ruess, O.E.S.A. In 1729 the archdiocese of Vienna received about eighty parishes that until then had belonged to the diocese of Passau, which were in the district of the Vienna woods. In connection with the expansion of the archdiocesan territory, the cardinal obtained the establishment of a permanent auxiliary bishop. The cardinal tried to become familiar with the new parishes and to quickly visit them. In a lengthy trial, he reached in 1729 the elimination of the exemption of the chapter. As compensation, in 1734, he gave the canons of the chapters the right to the use of pontificalia. Participated in the conclave of 1730, which elected Pope Clement XII. Received the red hat and the title of Ss. Marcellino e Pietro, August 14, 1730. Protector of the Order of Szent Paul (Pauline Fathers) in Austria, Hungary, Poland and along the Rhine, July 21, 1734. Member of the commission to examine the complaints of the Protestants in Hungary, 1734. To promote the devotion to the Eucharist, he established the 40-hour prayer; ordered that the priests of the archdiocese accompany the Blessed Sacrament in processions with torches. In 1735, Cardinal KoIlonitsch also ordered that in memory of the suffering of Christ, the bell rang on Thursday evening and Friday morning. The veneration of St. John of Nepomuk was strongly promoted; and the cardinal also created a new diocesan ritual. In 1736, Cardinal KoIlonitsch asked Emperor Charles VI in a detailed memorandum to protect the Catholic Church against the encroachment of the Protestants, especially in Vienna itself (5). He presented a counter-reformation program on the basis of religion-related provisions of the Peace of Westphalia. This move, although unsuccessful, brought about various improvements. In the lands of the missions was appointed a chaplain in Vienna itself with the concern for the converts. The cardinal also built the Konvertitenkassa. Protector of Germany, 1738; he held the position until his death. The Freemasons vehemently opposed Cardinal KoIlonitsch. On a proposal from the cardinal, the Jews of Vienna were grouped together, in a ghetto. Participated in the conclave of 1740, which elected Pope Benedict XIV. Opted for the title of S. Crisogono, August 29, 1740. In 1740, he was entrusted with representing the interests of the House of Hapsburg. Also in 1740, he forbade the introduction of new statues and their unusual clothing. Cardinal Kollonitsch had the confidence of the imperial court and during the reforms implemented by Empress Maria Theresa, he assisted in that he forbade the preachers from criticizing the actions of the monarch. In purely spiritual matters, however, he defended himself against intervention by the government. He took a number of initiatives to improve education and discipline of the clergy and to intensify the pastoral care, including regular visitations. In 1741, the cardinal established the dignity of canon schoolmaster in the cathedral chapter; and in 1743, following the directives of the Council of Trent, that of canon theologian. For the cure at the metropolitan cathedral of Sankt Stefan, the statutes that he had issued in 1723 were enhanced significantly in 1741; he saw the establishment of the vita communis also for the secular clergy. Because of the great increase in population of Vienna, the cardinal had to augment the number of parishes and chapels, as well as vicariates. He promoted the establishment of the Piarists, the Salesian Sisters and the Franciscans throughout the archdiocese. At the same time, the cardinal protected the secular clergy against the interference of the religious clergy in their pastoral rights. In 1743, he was named protector of Austria and Hungary, succeeding Cardinal Niccolò del Giudice. In 1746, he had to accept a reprimand for failure to comply with the Placetum regium. He had a diocesan catechism printed; and ordered that on Sundays and public holidays the Gospel should be read in the local language; at the cathedral, after the Sunday sermon, an additional rosary was introduced. In 1749, the cardinal established that all school teachers had to pass a test on religion before taking their positions. The cardinal was director and president of the Hofalmosenkassa until 1749. On September 8, 1750, the cardinal asked Benedict XIV to name Canon Johannes Joseph von Trautson of Passau his coadjutor with the right of succession; the pope elected the canon bishop on December 7, 1750; and the cardinal personally consecrated him titular archbishop of Cartago in the midnight mass of 1750. As a builder, the cardinal concerned himself especially for those churches that were on the family property or subordinated to the archbishop's patronage, such as in Großschützen, Obersiebenbrunn, Vienna-St. Veit, Oberlaa and other village churches; he also built the archbishop's palace and renovated the palace in St. Veit. In the administration of temporalities, he showed great talent and diligence, so that the archdiocese was well-ordered and in a solid financial state at his death.

Death. April 12, 1751, early in the morning, Vienna. Exposed and buried in the metropolitan cathedral of Vienna. In his testament, he ordered that the family possession should fall after the extinction of the male line of the counts of Kollonitsch to the archdiocese of Vienna; in this way, the archdiocese in 1874 came into possession of the possessions of Kollonitsch-Obersiebenbrunn and Jedenspeigen; in addition, the late cardinal he left as beneficiaries the metropolitan cathedral chapter of Vienna, the catechetical mission of the Jesuits in Parham, and the poor.

Bibliography. Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. 9 vols. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1794, VIII, 230-231; Notizie per l'anno bissestile 1752. Rome : Nella Stamperia del Chracas, presso S. Marco al Corso, 1752, p. 131, no. 40; Ritzler, Remigium, and Pirminum Sefrin. Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recientoris Aevi. Volumen V (1667-1730). Patavii : Typis et Sumptibus Domus Editorialis "Il Messaggero di S. Antonio" apud Basilicam S. Antonii, 1952, pp. 37, 402 and 414; Ritzler, Remigium, and Pirminum Sefrin. Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recientoris Aevi. Volumen VI (1730-1799). Patavii : Typis et Sumptibus Domus Editorialis "Il Messaggero di S. Antonio" apud Basilicam S. Antonii, 1968, pp. 43 and 45; Siebert, Susanne. "Sigismund von Kollonitz", in: Biographisch-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon (BBKL), band 4, 348349; Weißensteiner, Johann. "Kollonitsch (Kollonitz) Sigismund Graf von (1677-1751). Die Bischöfe des Heiligen Römischen Reiches, 1648 bis 1803 : ein biographisches Lexikon. Herausgegeben von Erwin Gatz, unter Mitwirkung von Stephan M. Janker. Berlin : Duncker & Humblot, 1990, p. 236-239.

Links. Biography, in German, Academic dictionaries and encyclopedias, his engraving, arms and biography, in German, Wikipedia; biography, in Hungarian, last on the page, Magyar Katolikus Lexikon; brief biographical data, in English, Encyclopedia of Austria; same data, in German, Österreich-Lexikon; his portrait, Piarist School, Vács; Central Archives of the Hungarian Province of the Piarist Order; his portrait by János Schmit, Axio Art; his portrait by Jacob van Schuppen, Araldica Vaticana; his engraving, Peter Bierl, Buch & Kunstantiquariat; his engraving by Gustav Adolf Müller, based on the portrait by Jacob van van Schuppen, Bibliothek, Universität Regensburg; his engraving, Antique Portrait; and another engraving, Rektorat Schlosskapelle Schönbrunn.

(1) This is according to Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recentioris Aevi, V, 402. Other sources indicate that he was born on May 30, 1667, in Vienna, Austria; and on May 30, 1676, in Pozsony (Bratislava).
(2) This is according to Weißensteiner, "Kollonitsch (Kollonitz) Sigismund Graf von (1677-1751). Die Bischöfe des Heiligen Römischen Reiches, 1648 bis 1803, p. 237, which is in conflict with the date of ordination, October 22,1699, given by his biographical entry by Siebert, "Sigismund von Kollonitz", in: Biographisch-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon (BBKL), band 4, 348349;
(3) Weißensteiner, "Kollonitsch (Kollonitz) Sigismund Graf von (1677-1751). Die Bischöfe des Heiligen Römischen Reiches, 1648 bis 1803, p. 236, says that in 1705 he was appointed bishop of Scutari, a diocese of the Hungarian crown, but neither Pius Bonifatius Gams, Series episcoporum Ecclesiae catholicae (3 v. in 1. Graz : Akademische Druck- u. Verlagsanstalt, 1957), p. 418, nor Ritzler, Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recientoris Aevi, V, 347, mention him among the occupants of that see.
(4) This is according to Weißensteiner, "Kollonitsch (Kollonitz) Sigismund Graf von (1677-1751). Die Bischöfe des Heiligen Römischen Reiches, 1648 bis 1803, p. 237. He is not mentioned as such by any of the other sources consulted or by the catalog of inquisitors general of Spain.
(5) The title of the memorandum was Gravamina religionis catholicae et in specie Archidioceseos Viennensis contra haereticos accrescentes ab eminentissimo Cardinale et Archiepiscopo Viennensi Sigismundo a Kononitsch augustissimo Imperatori Carolo VI. praesentata a. 1736, (Wien 1736).

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(20) 3. SINZENDORF, Philip Ludwig von (1699-1747)

Birth. July 14, 1699, Paris, France. Second son of Count Philipp Ludwig Wenzel von Sinzendorf and Countess Rosina Katharina von Waldstein; he had three brothers and one sister. His father was the Austrian ambassador to France.

Education. He was destined by his family for an ecclesiastical career. Initial studies with the Jesuits in Vienna; he went to Rome in 1714 and studied at Seminario Romano, Rome; obtained a doctorate in theology, November 26, 1717; and in utroque iure, both canon and civil law, December 20, 1717; while at Collegio, he established a close contact with Prospero Lambertini, future Pope Benedict XIV, as well as with other influential personalities of the papal court. During his stay in Rome, he resided at Collegio Germanico.

Early life. Canon of the cathedral chapters of Cologne and Salzburg, 1717. Canon of the cathedral chapter of Olomouc; provost of Ardagger, Lower Austria; and abbot of the rich abbey of Pécsvárad, Hungary. He was a conclavist of Cardinal Álvaro Cienfuegos, S.J., in the conclave of 1721.

Priesthood. Ordained, 1722. His father did not succeed in obtaining for him the post of auditor of the Sacred Roman Rota, but instead, on May 5, 1725, obtained the imperial nomination for the see of Györ, Hungary.

Episcopate. Elected bishop of Györ, September 11, 1726. Retained for a triennium the canonries in Salzburg and Olomouc and the abbey of Pécsvárad. Consecrated, November 17, 1726, Vienna, by Girolamo Grimaldi, titular archbishop of Edessa di Osroene, (no information found about the co-consecrators). Granted dispensation to be electable to the sees of Salzburg and Olomouc, June 20, 1727. His father was not able to obtain for him a better endowed diocese, but succeeded in procuring him the cardinalate.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of November 26, 1727. The pope sent him the red biretta with an apostolic brief of December 23, 1727; Emperor Karl VI imposed the red biretta on him on April 4, 1728, in the court chapel in Vienna. Participated in the conclave of 1730, which elected Pope Clement XII. Received the red hat and the title of S. Maria sopra Minerva, August 14, 1730. He administered his diocese to the full satisfaction of the Austrian government. Canon of the cathedral chapter of Breslau, 1731; he tried to obtain the eligibility to the see of Breslau but Pope Clement XII refused to grant as long as its bishop, Franz Ludwig von Pfalz-Neuburg, lived; the pope wanted to avoid the accumulation of benefices. Granted dispensation to be elected to the see of Breslau by a simple majority, June 6, 1732, after the death of its bishop. Elected bishop of Breslau by the cathedral chapter, July 14, 1732. Preconized for that see, September 3, 1732. He took possession of the see in November of that same year; his relations with the cathedral chapter were always tense. He was member of a commission convened to examine the grievances of the Hungarian Protestants. Participated in the conclave of 1740, which elected Pope Benedict XIV. In 1740-1741, after the death of Emperor Karl VI, King Frederick II of Prussia seized Silesia and annexed it his territories; the relations between the king and the cardinal were at first amicable but when the king learned of the cardinal's sympathy for Austria, he placed him under arrest in his residence in Breslau; the cardinal was released on April 18, 1741; but had to leave his see for the duration of the Silesian war; the conflict lasted until September 10, 1741, when Austria and Prussia reached an agreement; then, the cardinal took an unexpected step and congratulated King Frederick II on October 22 for his success; the cardinal caused a big surprise in Vienna, Breslau and Rome. By the treaty signed by the king of Prussia and Empress Maria Theresa, nine-tenths of the diocese of Breslau came under the control of Prussia, creating a new situation for Cardinal Sinzendorf. King Frederick II of Prussia wanted to establish a different design for the church-state relationship. To this end, in 1742, although the cardinal was only forty-three years old, the monarch wanted to appoint his favorite Philipp Gothard von Schaffgotsch, who was twenty-seven years old, as coadjutor of Breslau; with his help, the king hoped to enforce an easier subordination of the Church under the state authority; Cardinal Sinzendorf agreed to this proposal after a long negotiation in which it was no secret to the king that he had serious reservations about the candidate; King Frederick II, in recognition of the cardinal's "loyal" behavior, decorated him with the Order of the Black Eagle; Pope Benedict XIV appointed the new coadjutor on March 4, 1744; the pontiff refused the choice of the cathedral chapter of Breslau and banished the rebellious canons to Magdebourg.The cardinal died after having participated a few months earlier in Salzburg in the election of the new archbishop.

Death. September 28, 1747, Breslau. Exposed and buried in the cathedral of Breslau.

Bibliography. Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. 9 vols. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1794, VIII, 231; Gatz, Erwin. "Sinzendorf, Philipp Ludwig Reichgraf von (1699-1747). Die Bischöfe des Heiligen Römischen Reiches, 1648 bis 1803 : ein biographisches Lexikon. Herausgegeben von Erwin Gatz, unter Mitwirkung von Stephan M. Janker. Berlin : Duncker & Humblot, 1990, p. 464-466; Notizie per l'anno bissestile 1752. Rome : Nella Stamperia del Chracas, presso S. Marco al Corso, 1752, p. 129, no. 33; Ritzler, Remigium, and Pirminum Sefrin. Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recientoris Aevi. Volumen V (1667-1730). Patavii : Typis et Sumptibus Domus Editorialis "Il Messaggero di S. Antonio" apud Basilicam S. Antonii, 1952, pp. 37 and 226; Ritzler, Remigium, and Pirminum Sefrin. Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recientoris Aevi. Volumen VI (1730-1799). Patavii : Typis et Sumptibus Domus Editorialis "Il Messaggero di S. Antonio" apud Basilicam S. Antonii, 1968, pp. 46 and 445; Tusor, Péter. Purpura Pannonica : az esztergomi "bíborosi szék" kialakulásának elozminyei a 17. században = Purpura Pannonica : the "Cardinalitial See" of Strigonium and its Antecedens in the 17th Century. Budapest : Róma : Research Institute of Church History at Péter Pázmány Catholic University, 2005. (Collectanea Vaticana Hungariae, Classis I, vol. 3), p. 206 and 328.

Links. His arms and biography, in Italian, Wikipedia; his engraving, Antique Portrait; his engraving, Bildarchiv Austria. Die Bildplattform der Österreichischen Nationalbibliothek; his engraving by Gaspare Massi, based on a portrait by Pietro Nelli, Bildarchiv Austria. Die Bildplattform der Österreichischen Nationalbibliothek; and his effigy on a medal, Numismatic collection of Olomouc archiepiscopate, Czech Republic.

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(21) 4. MOTA E SILVA, João da (1685-1747)

Birth. August 14, 1685, Castelo Branco, diocese of Guimarães, Portugal. Of an illustrious family. His brother, Father Pedro da Mota e Silva, was secretário dos Negócios do Reino (minister of the Interior) from 1736 until 1756. His last name is also listed as Motta.

Education. Studied at the University of Coimbra, Coimbra (obtained a doctorate).

Priesthood. Ordained (no information found). Canon of the collegiate church of São Tomé.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of November 26, 1727; with the apostolic brief of December 18, 1727, the pope sent him the red biretta; he never went to Rome to receive the red hat and the title. Did not participate in the conclave of 1730, which elected Pope Clement XII.

Episcopate. Named administrator of the archdiocese of Braga by the king of Portugal, 1732; he never obtained papal confirmationas archbishop of that see; the archdiocese was vacant from 1728 to 1740. After the death of Diogo Mendonça, of the royal court, in 1736, he became the principal counselor to King João V of Portugal, sort of a prime minister, although he was never named to such a post. Did not participate in the conclave of 1740, which elected Pope Benedict XIV.

Death. October 4, 1747, Lisbon. Exposed and buried in the church of Santa Maria do Monte Carmelo, Lisbon. This church was almost totally destroyed in the earthquake of 1755.

Bibliography. Cardella, Lorenzo. Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa. 9 vols. Rome : Stamperia Pagliarini, 1794, VIII, 231-232; Notizie per l'anno bissestile 1752. Rome : Nella Stamperia del Chracas, presso S. Marco al Corso, 1752, p. 129, no. 34; Ritzler, Remigium, and Pirminum Sefrin. Hierarchia Catholica Medii et Recientoris Aevi. Volumen V (1667-1730). Patavii : Typis et Sumptibus Domus Editorialis "Il Messaggero di S. Antonio" apud Basilicam S. Antonii, 1952, pp. 37

Link. His engraving and biographical entry, in Portuguese, Wikipedia; biographical data, in Portuguese, 5, três, Círculo Fluminense de Estudos Filológicos e Linguísticos; brief biographical data in Os Cardeais Portugueses, in Portuguese, patriarcado de Lisboa; his engraving and biographical data, in Portuguese, domjoaoquinto.blogspot; his engraving, Wikimedia; another engraving, from the same source; his engraving, Deutsche Fotothek; his engraving, Bildarchiv Austria. Die Bildplattform der Österreichischen Nationalbibliothek; his arms, Biblioteca Nacional de Portugal; list of the occupants of the see of Braga, in Portuguese, Wikipedia..


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