The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church

Biographical Dictionary
Pope Pius XI (1922-1939)
Consistory of March 24, 1924 (IV)


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(13) 1. MUNDELEIN, George William
(1872-1939)

Birth. July 2, 1872, New York, New York, United States of America. Son of Francis Mundelein and Mary Goetz.

Education. Studied at Manhattan College, New York; at Saint Vincent's Seminary, Latrobe; and at the Pontifical Urbanian Athenaeum "De Propaganda Fide," Rome.

Priesthood. Ordained, June 8, 1895, Rome, by Charles Edward McDonnell, bishop of Brooklyn. Pastoral ministry in the diocese of Brooklyn and secretary to its bishop, 1895-1897; chancellor, 1897-1909.

Episcopate. Elected titular bishop of Loima and appointed auxiliary of Brooklyn, June 30, 1909. Consecrated, September 21, 1909, St. James Pro-cathedral, Brooklyn, by Charles E. McDonnell, bishop of Brooklyn, assisted by Charles Henry Colton, bishop of Buffalo, and by John Joseph O'Connor, bishop of Newark. His episcopal motto was Domine adjutor meus. Promoted to the metropolitan see of Chicago, December 9, 1915. Assistant at the Pontifical Throne, May 8, 1920.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of March 24, 1924; received the red hat and the title of S. Maria del Popolo, March 27, 1924. Papal legate to the 8th National Eucharistic Congress, New Orleans, September 13, 1938. Participated in the conclave of 1939, which elected Pope Pius XII.

Death. October 2, 1939, unexpectedly, from massive thrombosis in his sleep (only twelve days after celebrating the thirtieth anniversary of his episcopal consecration), in Mundelein, town named after him. To accommodate the cardinal's funeral, the city of Chicago hastily re-paved State street, where the subway had been under construction. More than one million people paid their respects as the body of the cardinal lay in state in the nave of the cathedral. His remains were buried behind the main altar of the chapel of the Seminary of Chicago.

Bibliography. Bransom, Charles N. Ordinations of U. S. Catholic bishops 1970-1989. A chronological list. Washington, D.C. : National Conference of Catholic Bishops ; United States Catholic Conference, 1990, p. 63; Code, Bernard. Dictionary of the American Hierarchy (1789-1964). New York : Joseph F. Wagner, 1964, p. 211; Kantowicz, Edward R. Corporation sole : Cardinal Mundelein and Chicago Catholicism. Notre Dame, Ind. : University of Notre Dame Press, 1983. (Notre Dame studies in American Catholicism); Martin, Paul R. The first cardinal of the West. Chicago : The New World Publishing Co., 1934.

Webgraphy. His arms, Araldica Vaticana.


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(14) 2. HAYES, Patrick Joseph
(1867-1938)

Birth. November 20, 1867, New York, United States of America. Son of Daniel Hayes and Mary Gleason.

Education. Studied at Manhattan College, N.Y.; at St. Joseph's Seminary, Troy, N.Y.; and at The Catholic University of America, Washington.

Priesthood. Ordained, September 8, 1892, Troy, by Michael Augustine Corrigan, archbishop of New York. Further studies, 1892-1894. Pastoral ministry in the archdiocese of New York, 1894-1903; and 1915-1919. President of the Catholic College, New York, and archdiocesan chancellor of New York, 1903-1914. Domestic prelate of His Holiness, October 15, 1907.

Episcopate. Elected titular bishop of Tagaste and appointed auxiliary of New York on July 3, 1914. Consecrated, October 14, 1914, St. Patrick's cathedral, New York, by Cardinal John Farley, archbishop of New York, assisted by Henry Gabriels, bishop of Ogdensburg, and by Thomas Francis Cusack, bishop of Albany. His episcopal motto was Domine mane nobiscum. Named military ordinary for United States Army and Navy on November 24, 1917. Promoted to the metropolitan see of New York on March 10, 1919.

Cardinalate. Created cardinal priest in the consistory of March 24, 1924; received the red hat and the title of S. Maria in Via, March 27, 1924. Legate a latere to the National Eucharistic Congress, Cleveland, Ohio, August 20, 1935.

Death. September 4, 1938, quietly, while saying his night prayers, of a heart attack caused by coronary thrombosis in Monticello, Sullivan County, New York. The members of his household found him in his bedroom with a crucifix clasped in his fingers. More than 500,000 people filed past his coffin as he lay in state in the metropolitan cathedral of St. Patrick in New York. He was originally buried in a grotto chapel at St. Joseph's camp. When the sisters sold the property, his remains were transferred to the crypt under the altar of St. Patrick's cathedral. The Cardinal Hayes High School in The Bronx is named after him.

Bibliography. Bransom, Charles N. Ordinations of U. S. Catholic bishops 1970-1989. A chronological list. Washington, D.C. : National Conference of Catholic Bishops ; United States Catholic Conference, 1990, p. 68; Code, Bernard. Dictionary of the American Hierarchy (1789-1964). New York : Joseph F. Wagner, 1964, pp. 127-128; Kelly. John B. Cardinal Hayes, one of ourselves. New York: Farrar and Rinehart, 1940.

Webgraphy. His arms, Araldica Vaticana.

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